Not for Profit

Why Democracy Needs the Humanities

Author: Martha C. Nussbaum

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400883504

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 7411

In this short and powerful book, celebrated philosopher Martha Nussbaum makes a passionate case for the importance of the liberal arts at all levels of education. Historically, the humanities have been central to education because they have been seen as essential for creating competent democratic citizens. But recently, Nussbaum argues, thinking about the aims of education has gone disturbingly awry in the United States and abroad. We increasingly treat education as though its primary goal were to teach students to be economically productive rather than to think critically and become knowledgeable, productive, and empathetic individuals. This shortsighted focus on profitable skills has eroded our ability to criticize authority, reduced our sympathy with the marginalized and different, and damaged our competence to deal with complex global problems. And the loss of these basic capacities jeopardizes the health of democracies and the hope of a decent world. In response to this dire situation, Nussbaum argues that we must resist efforts to reduce education to a tool of the gross national product. Rather, we must work to reconnect education to the humanities in order to give students the capacity to be true democratic citizens of their countries and the world. In a new preface, Nussbaum explores the current state of humanistic education globally and shows why the crisis of the humanities has far from abated. Translated into over twenty languages, Not for Profit draws on the stories of troubling—and hopeful—global educational developments. Nussbaum offers a manifesto that should be a rallying cry for anyone who cares about the deepest purposes of education.
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The Machine's Child

Author: Kage Baker

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780765354617

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 9141

In the sequel to The Life of the World to Come, Alec Checkerfield's AI, Captain Morgan, has masterminded the rescue of the immortal cyborg, Mendoza the botanist, growing her a new body and reviving her, and has retrieved the personalities of her dead lovers, Nicholas and Edward, and placed them in Alec's body as the first step in a new battle against The Company. Reprint.
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Political Corruption

Readings in Comparative Analysis

Author: Michael Johnston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351308351

Category: Political Science

Page: 582

View: 2243

Corruption is once again high on the international policy agenda as a result of globalization, the spread of democracy, and major scandals and reform initiatives. But the concept itself has been a focus for social scientists for many years, and new findings and data take on richer meanings when viewed in the context of long-term developments and enduring conceptual debates. This compendium, a much-enriched version of a work that has been a standard reference in the field since 1970, offers concepts, cases, and fresh evidence for comparative analysis.Building on a nucleus of classic studies laying out the nature and development of the concept of corruption, the book also incorporates recent work on economic, cultural, and linguistic dimensions of the problem, as well as critical analyses of several approaches to reform. While many authors are political scientists, work by historians, economists, and sociologists are strongly represented. Two-thirds of the nearly fifty articles are based either on studies especially written or translated for this volume, or on selected journal literature published in the 1990s. The tendency to treat corruption as merely a synonym for bribery is illuminated by analyses of the diverse terminology and linguistic techniques that help distinguish corruption problems in the major languages. Recent attempts to measure corruption, and to analyze its causes and effects quantitatively are also critically examined. New contributions emphasize especially: corruption phenomena in Asia and Africa; contrasts among region and regime types; comparing U.S. state corruption incidence; European Party finance and corruption; assessments of international corruption rating project; analyses of international corruption control treaties; unintended consequences of anti-corruption efforts. Cumulatively, the book combines description richness, analytical thrust, conceptual awareness, and contextual articulation.
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The Outlook

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

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God of the Machine

Author: Isabel Paterson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351517147

Category: Political Science

Page: 308

View: 3765

The God of the Machine presents an original theory of history and a bold defense of individualism as the source of moral and political progress. When it was published in 1943, Isabel Paterson's work provided fresh intellectual support for the endangered American belief in individual rights, limited government, and economic freedom. The crisis of today's collectivized nations would not have surprised Paterson; in The God of the Machine, she had explored the reasons for collectivism's failure. Her book placed her in the vanguard of the free-enterprise movement now sweeping the world.Paterson sees the individual creative mind as the dynamo of history, and respect for the individual's God-given rights as the precondition for the enormous release of energy that produced the modern world. She sees capitalist institutions as the machinery through which human energy works, and government as a device properly used merely to cut off power to activities that threaten personal liberty.Paterson applies her general theory to particular issues in contemporary life, such as education, .social welfare, and the causes of economic distress. She severely criticizes all but minimal application of government, including governmental interventions that most people have long taken for granted. The God of the Machine offers a challenging perspective on the continuing, worldwide debate about the nature of freedom, the uses of power, and the prospects of human betterment.Stephen Cox's substantial introduction to The God of the Machine is a comprehensive and enlightening account of Paterson's colorful life and work. He describes The God of the Machine as "not just theory, but rhapsody, satire, diatribe, poetic narrative." Paterson's work continues to be relevant because "it exposes the moral and practical failures of collectivism, failures that are now almost universally acknowledged but are still far from universally understo
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Quarterly Bulletin

Author: Detroit Public Library

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

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Abraham Lincoln Campaign Newspapers 1860 - 1864

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8883

518 pages of Abraham Lincoln campaign newspapers from the elections of 1860 and 1864. Many newspapers at the time took specific and clearly partisan positions, which were often reflected in the names of the newspaper. The newspapers in this collection go beyond just a partisan political bias. These newspapers were created and existed only to get Abraham Lincoln elected or re-elected President, then ceased publication after the election. Election 1860 In 1860 there were three mainstream political parties in the United States; Republican, Democratic, and the new Constitutional Union party. The Democratic Party split into two over the issue of slavery, making 1860 a four way race. In 1860, Abraham Lincoln was the least known of all candidates seeking the nomination of the Republican Party. Best known and leading the Republican pack was United States Senator, former governor of New York and future United States Secretary of State, William H. Seward. Second was Ohio governor and future United States Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase. Third was Missouri lawyer, politician and future United States Attorney General, Edward Bates. Fourth was Horace Greeley, founder and editor The New York Tribune, former member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York's 6th district, and in 1872 the founder of the Liberal Republican Party. Fifth was Illinois lawyer and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois' 7th district (1847 - 1849), Abraham Lincoln. A former Whig party member, Lincoln became engaged in Illinois state Republican Party politics in 1854. At the 1856 Republican National Convention, the nominating process for the Vice President spot on the party's ticket ended with Lincoln coming in second place. In 1858, Lincoln sought to replace the incumbent Democrat United States Senator from Illinois, Stephen A. Douglas. The two clashed during a series of seven debates. In 1858, United States senators were elected by their state legislatures. Democrats won a slight majority of seats in the Illinois General Assembly in 1858. The legislature then re-elected Douglas. Despite his loss due to internal party politics, Lincoln gained popular publicity from his performance during the Lincoln–Douglas debates, which allowed him to enter the pack of Republican candidates in 1860. One by one the Republican candidates fell away. The consensus was that Greely was too unpredictable, Bates was too old, and Chase did not possess political skills. Lincoln won out over Seward. Seward's outspokenness on the spread of slavery made many believe that was he too radical on the issue. Lincoln was seen as a moderate when came to slavery; also it was hoped that since he was from Illinois, that he would appeal to voters in the west. The Democratic Party split into two during its national convention in Charleston, South Carolina, in April 1860. The leading Democratic candidate was Illinois Senator Stephen Douglas. Douglas advocated popular sovereignty, where the majority within a state would decide if slavery was to exist in that state. This angered most Southern Democrats who wanted the right to hold slaves guaranteed in the western territories and future states. Delegates from eight southern states withdrew from the convention and nominated their own candidate, Vice President of the United States John C. Breckinridge. A group of conservative former Whigs, along with Know Nothing party members and some Southern Democrats who were against succession, joined to form the Constitutional Union Party. In their platform they strongly spoke out against disunion and avoided the issue of slavery. They nominated former United States Senator from Tennessee John Bell. On Election Day, Tuesday, November 6, 1860, Republican Lincoln received 39.9 percent of the popular vote, Northern Democrat Douglas 29.5 percent, Southern Democrat Breckinridge 18.1 percent, and Constitutional Unionist Bell 12.5 percent. In the Electoral College Lincoln received 180 electoral votes; Breckinridge won 72 of the 303 total available electoral votes. Election 1860 Newspaper - The Freeport Wide Awake 52 pages of the Freeport Wide Awake, constituting 13 issues dating from August 18, 1860 to November 17, 1860. This weekly campaign newspaper was published between the time of the Chicago Convention and after the election in November; it supported Abraham Lincoln and Republican candidates. The newspaper's slogan was "No slumber till the battle is won." Three other newspapers were published in 1860 with "Wide Awake" in their title in: Providence; De Witt, Iowa; and Akron. Only one copy of any of the issues of these other "Wide Awake" newspapers is known to still be in existence. In the 1850's the Republican Party organized marching clubs made up of young men across the United States. In 1860, a number of "Wide Awake Clubs" were organized to support Abraham Lincoln. The Wide Awakes adopted a paramilitary style. Members wore black glazed hats, oil cloth capes to protect themselves from flames and carried six-foot long torches with a whale oil canister at its top. Wide Awakes held rallies where they marched with their torches lit, singing political campaign songs and reciting campaign slogans. Also included in this collection is a four page circular produced by the Albany, New York Republican Wide-Awake Club, regarding the uniform and the organization of the club. Election 1860 Serial Tract - Lincoln and Liberty!!! 38 pages of the tract "Lincoln and Liberty!!!," constituting 10 issues dating from June 19th, 1860 to October 2, 1860. This serial was published by the Young Men's Republican Union of the City of New York. The Young Men's Republican Union sponsored a lecture given by Lincoln on February 27, 1860 at the Cooper Union in New York City. The Cooper Union speech would be regarded by many, including eminent Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer as, "The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President." Election 1860 Newspaper - The Rail Splitter 24 pages of The Rail Splitter newspaper constituting 6 issues dating from June 23, 1860 to October 27, 1860. The Rail Splitter was a campaign newspaper in support of candidate Abraham Lincoln and the Republican Party in the presidential campaign of 1860. This newspaper was based in Chicago, Illinois and published 18 weekly issues from June 23, 1860 to October 27, 1860, by publisher Charles Leib. A different pro-Lincoln newspaper also called the Rail Splitter was published in Cincinnati during the same time period. In the first issue, June 23, 1860, Leib wrote this in the introduction to his newspaper, "We have in our Prospectus given the reasons that induced us to establish 'The Rail Splitter.' It is occasionally thrown into our teeth, that in 1856 we labored earnestly for the election of James Buchanan, and it is true. We believed him to be an honest man, and that he ("he" in italics for emphasis) would be President, if elected. We were however, mistaken, for he is the willing tool of the slavery propagandists, who have put a collar around his neck, and will not even permit him to bark, unless in their presence." He finished his introduction by stating, "We are responsible for all articles that appear in 'The Rail Splitter,' and as this promises to be a warm and exciting campaign, in which there will be a great deal of crimination and recrimination; if we should incur the displeasure of any of the Democracy (the term Democracy was often used at the time to refer the Democratic Party and its rule) for telling the truth, and they should feel aggrieved, they can call at our office, at 66 Randolph Street, up stairs, where we will be most happy to give them any satisfaction they may desire. We will not, however, take back any statement we make, of the truth of which we are satisfied." Election 1864 The election of 1864 was disrupted by the Civil War. Electoral votes were not counted from states in rebellion. Tennessee and Louisiana, under Union control chose Electoral College electors; however Congress did not count their votes. The Democrats in non-rebellion states were divided between "Peace Democrats" and "War Democrats." The Republican Party, in a move to appeal to Northern Democrats in favor of the war, changed its name to the National Union Party for the 1864 election. Lincoln was the Republican/National Union Party nominee. Union Major General George B. McClellan was the Democratic Party nominee. McClellan ran as a "peace candidate." McClellan was still a U.S. Army general on active duty during the campaign. He did not resign his commission until Election Day. McClellan campaigned on continuing the war and restoring the Union. He was not seeking the abolition of slavery. The former position differed from the Democratic Party platform which called for an immediate end to the war and negotiated settlement with the Confederacy. The Democratic platform included the statement, "Resolved, That this Convention does explicitly declare, as the sense of the American people, that after four years of failure to restore the Union by the experiment of war, during which, under the pretense of military necessity or war power higher than the Constitution, the Constitution itself has been disregarded in every part, and public liberty and private right alike trodden down, and the material prosperity of the country essentially impaired, justice, humanity, liberty, and the public welfare, demand that immediate efforts be made for a cessation of hostilities, with a view to the ultimate Convention of all the States, or other peaceable means, to the end that at the earliest practicable moment, peace may be restored on the basis of the Federal Union of the States." Lincoln had strong doubt that he would be re-elected President. The last President to be re-elected was Andrew Jackson in 1832. Military victories during the fall of 1864 boosted President Lincoln's popularity. On Election Day November 8, 1864 only 4 percent of the votes casted were by servicemen. Each state decided how they would handle voting by members of the military. Only seven states, California, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin, allowed servicemen to vote. Many servicemen would have been happy to see the election end the war. However, it is believed that most thought that ending the war would mean that their sacrifices would have been in vain. Many soldiers wrote to family members urging them to vote for Lincoln. Election Day results saw Lincoln winning 55% of the popular vote, approximately 403,000 votes. Lincoln received 30,503, 75.8 percent, of the votes cast by soldiers. Since the last election in 1860, the Electoral College added three new states Kansas, West Virginia, and Nevada, all free-soil states. In the Electoral College Lincoln received 212 of the 233 votes. Lincoln won all but 3 of the 25 states convening in the Electoral College, losing New Jersey, Delaware, and Kentucky. Election 1864 Newspaper - The Campaign Dial 404 pages of The Campaign Dial newspaper, consisting of all 51 issues published. The paper was published from September 8, 1864 to November 5, 1864. The Campaign Dial had higher production value than other campaign newspapers of the era. It was published daily except on Sunday. At a time when many major newspapers were only 4 pages, The Campaign Dial was 8 pages. The front page of most issues contained an illustration. Download for free the 38 page paper written by historian Gary L. Bunker for the Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association concerning The Campaign Dial at: The Campaign Dial A Premier Lincoln Campaign Paper, 1864 by Gary L. Bunker.pdf. It contains a week-by-week analysis of the content of the newspaper. Election 1860 Newspaper - The Kentucky Campaign In addition to the 518 pages described above, this collection includes 24 pages, 3 issues, of the Southern Democrat campaign newspaper The Kentucky Campaign, which was in support of John C. Breckinridge for president. The slogan of the newspaper was a Breckinridge quote, "The constitution on equality of the States! These are symbols of everlasting union. Let these be the rally cry of the people."
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Harold Laski and American Liberalism

Author: Gary Best

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351516280

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 7061

For nearly three decades, the English political scientist Harold Laski was the gray eminence of American liberalism and its most influential Marxist public intellectual. As a fervent proponent of the New Deal in the 1930s, much of Laski's success stemmed from the fact that he offered answers when so many Americans had only questions. By the postwar years, however, his reputation was in decline and his influence left the Democratic Party vulnerable in the1948 elections. In Harold Laski and American Liberalism Gary Dean Best traces the trajectory of Laski's American career and accounts for its ultimate failure.American politics and society were central to Laski's intellectual enterprise. As Best shows, probably no one residing in America has published as many words critical of the United States as did this Englishman. Virtually no aspect of American life went unscathed, and yet at the root of every attack was American capitalism, the businessman, those with property, who, in Laski's view were the source of all the perversion of American life.The 1930s was a period of ferment among America's intellectuals. By the 1940s it was only Laski who was bewildered--at the failure of his diagnoses and the rejection of his prescriptions even by those who had been captivated by him in the previous decade. By the time he died, in 1950, his earlier pronouncements seemed wide of the mark, and the increased stridency and shrillness produced by his disappointment had begun to bore even many who had been devoted to him in earlier years.As this volume shows, the real tragedy for Laski was that he allowed his intellect to be captured and held captive by the Marxian dialectic, denying himself the use of his own reason despite that dialectic's repeated failures. Harold Laski and American Liberalism will be of interest to intellectual historians, political scientists, and American studies specialists.
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Our Paper

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Juvenile delinquency

Page: N.A

View: 9763

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#Republic

Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media

Author: Cass R. Sunstein

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400890527

Category: Political Science

Page: 328

View: 1339

From the New York Times bestselling author of Nudge and The World According to Star Wars, a revealing account of how today's Internet threatens democracy—and what can be done about it As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views. It's no accident that on some occasions, people of different political views cannot even understand one another. It's also no surprise that terrorist groups have been able to exploit social media to deadly effect. Welcome to the age of #Republic. In this revealing book, New York Times bestselling author Cass Sunstein shows how today’s Internet is driving political fragmentation, polarization, and even extremism--and what can be done about it. He proposes practical and legal changes to make the Internet friendlier to democratic deliberation, showing that #Republic need not be an ironic term. Rather, it can be a rallying cry for the kind of democracy that citizens of diverse societies need most.
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Stealth Democracy

Americans' Beliefs About How Government Should Work

Author: John R. Hibbing,Elizabeth Theiss-Morse

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521009867

Category: Political Science

Page: 284

View: 9757

Examining how people want their democratic government to work, this study finds that Americans don't like many of the practices associated with democracy: the conflicts, the debates, the compromises. It finds that Americans don't want to have to see democracy in practice, nor do they want to be involved in politics. If American citizens had their way, political decisions would be made by unselfish decision-makers, lessening the need for monitoring government.
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Shadow Shoguns

The Rise and Fall of Japan's Postwar Political Machine

Author: Jacob M. Schlesinger

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804734578

Category: Political Science

Page: 366

View: 7141

This is a vivid account of the corrupt and improbable political machine that ran Japanese politics for twenty years, from the early 1970s to the early 1990s, the period during which Japan became the world's second-largest economy. Reviews "Washington lobbyists, Moscow mafiosi, and Beijing party bosses stand back! . . . Here is one of the longest running big-time political sleaze serials of the past quarter-century. . . . This was a book waiting to be written, and not only has Schlesinger done it, but he has also produced a fine job of political reporting." --New York Times Book Review "In a rollicking style, Schlesinger . . . demolishes the popular misconception that politicians are boring. His is a tale of monstrous personalities. . . . This is the most entertaining short history of Japanese politics this reviewer has encountered." --The Economist "A story which is told vividly in this well researched and reliable account. . . . A superb analysis of Japan's politics and economic affairs." --Washington Post Book World "Shadow Shoguns is a lively and anecdote-rich account of the eerie parallels between Tokyo's now-battered political machine and New York's Tammany Hall. . . . Schlesinger masterfully demonstrates why Prime Minister Tanaka personified the collusive ties between Japanese politicians and Big Business." --Business Week "A fascinating and penetrating tale about the Tanaka machine that dominated Japan's politics for several decades and whose demise in the early 1990s has created a political vacuum that accounts for many of Japan's current problems." --Foreign Affairs
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The Democrats

A Critical History

Author: Lance Selfa

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608460495

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 6485

"The Democrats: A Critical History is worthy reading for anyone who is interested in social change."--MediaMouse.org The 2006 elections put the Democrats in the majority in both houses of Congress, yet those hoping for change have been deeply disappointed. Lance Selfa looks at the Democrats in a broad historical perspective, showing that today’s betrayals stem from the Democratic Party’s role as one of the two parties serving the interests of the US establishment, not of the broader public or its “base” of women, African Americans, trade union members, and working and poor people. Many other books on the Democrats have seen the party’s recent history as a departure from its storied past as the “party of the people.” Selfa’s book is one of the few written for a popular audience to challenge this myth and to put today’s crisis of the Democratic Party’s legitimacy in a historical perspective. As the 2008 presidential season heats up, there will be many books about individual candidates and their personalities. This book is for people who want to go beyond campaign puffery to look at the serious topics and questions at stake, with a vision that isn’t limited to the next election cycle. Lance Selfa is a researcher and author. An editor and contributor to International Socialist Review, he edited The Struggle for Palestine (Haymarket Books, 2002). He lives in Chicago.
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