Birthright Citizens

A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America

Author: Martha S. Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107150345

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 5589

Explains the origins of the Fourteenth Amendment's birthright citizenship provision, as a story of black Americans' pre-Civil War claims to belonging.
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Birthright Citizens

A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America

Author: Martha S. Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110866539X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6466

Before the Civil War, colonization schemes and black laws threatened to deport former slaves born in the United States. Birthright Citizens recovers the story of how African American activists remade national belonging through battles in legislatures, conventions, and courthouses. They faced formidable opposition, most notoriously from the US Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott. Still, Martha S. Jones explains, no single case defined their status. Former slaves studied law, secured allies, and conducted themselves like citizens, establishing their status through local, everyday claims. All along they argued that birth guaranteed their rights. With fresh archival sources and an ambitious reframing of constitutional law-making before the Civil War, Jones shows how the Fourteenth Amendment constitutionalized the birthright principle, and black Americans' aspirations were realized. Birthright Citizens tells how African American activists radically transformed the terms of citizenship for all Americans.
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Birthright Citizens

A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America

Author: Martha S. Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316604724

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 2535

Before the Civil War, colonization schemes and black laws threatened to deport former slaves born in the United States. Birthright Citizens recovers the story of how African American activists remade national belonging through battles in legislatures, conventions, and courthouses. They faced formidable opposition, most notoriously from the US Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott. Still, Martha S. Jones explains, no single case defined their status. Former slaves studied law, secured allies, and conducted themselves like citizens, establishing their status through local, everyday claims. All along they argued that birth guaranteed their rights. With fresh archival sources and an ambitious reframing of constitutional law-making before the Civil War, Jones shows how the Fourteenth Amendment constitutionalized the birthright principle, and black Americans' aspirations were realized. Birthright Citizens tells how African American activists radically transformed the terms of citizenship for all Americans.
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Anchor Babies and the Challenge of Birthright Citizenship

Author: Leo R. Chavez

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503605264

Category: Political Science

Page: 120

View: 445

Birthright citizenship has a deep and contentious history in the United States, one often hard to square in a country that prides itself on being "a nation of immigrants." Even as the question of citizenship for children of immigrants was seemingly settled by the Fourteenth Amendment, vitriolic debate has continued for well over a century, especially in relation to U.S. race relations. Most recently, a provocative and decidedly more offensive term than birthright citizenship has emerged: "anchor babies." With this book, Leo R. Chavez explores the question of birthright citizenship, and of citizenship in the United States writ broadly, as he counters the often hyperbolic claims surrounding these so-called anchor babies. Chavez considers how the term is used as a political dog whistle, how changes in the legal definition of citizenship have affected the children of immigrants over time, and, ultimately, how U.S.-born citizens still experience trauma if they live in families with undocumented immigrants. By examining this pejorative term in its political, historical, and social contexts, Chavez calls upon us to exorcise it from public discourse and work toward building a more inclusive nation.
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The Birthright Lottery

Author: Ayelet Shachar

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674032712

Category: Law

Page: 273

View: 9119

The vast majority of the global population acquires citizenship purely by accidental circumstances of birth. In The Birthright Lottery, Ayelet Shachar argues that birthright citizenship in an affluent society can be thought of as a form of property inheritance: that is, a valuable entitlement transmitted by law to a restricted group of recipients under conditions that perpetuate the transfer of this prerogative to their heirs.
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Citizenship in Question

Evidentiary Birthright and Statelessness

Author: Benjamin N. Lawrance,Jacqueline Stevens

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780822362807

Category: Law

Page: 312

View: 7664

The contributors to Citizenship in Question demonstrate that the line separating citizenship and noncitizenship is ambiguous and inconsistent. In case studies analyzing the legal barriers to citizenship rights in over twenty countries, the contributors show how states use citizenship requirements to police racial, ethnic, class, and religious difference.
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Take the Leap

Change Your Career, Change Your Life

Author: Sara Bliss

Publisher: Touchstone

ISBN: 1501183184

Category: Self-Help

Page: 256

View: 6623

A road map for landing your dream job. Take the Leap features inspiration and advice from more than sixty-five people who transformed their lives—and with this guide, so can you. These are game changers, rule breakers, and side hustlers who once stood where you are now, wondering if they should take a risk. They went from production assistant to million-dollar screenplay writer; attorney to surf instructor; mom to DJ; hairdresser to firefighter; real estate agent to award-winning chef. Do you want to go for that career you’ve always dreamed about? Launch a new company? Become a tech mogul? Live a life of adventure? Save the world? You’ll find wisdom from successful mentors like creative visionary and writer Simon Doonan, entrepreneur Barbara Corcoran, NFL player turned artist/activist Aaron Maybin, and wellness and beauty guru Bobbi Brown. This is a career guide for today’s ever-changing job market. Thinking about your own next chapter? Take the leap.
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Birthright Citizenship in the United States

Analyses and Perspectives

Author: Garrett Manning

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781634852586

Category:

Page: 96

View: 3540

The first clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, known as the Citizenship Clause, provides that [a]ll persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. This generally has been taken to mean that any person born in the United States automatically gains U.S. citizenship, regardless of the citizenship or immigration status of the persons parents, with limited exceptions such as children born to recognized foreign diplomats. The current rule is often called birthright citizenship. However, driven in part by concerns about unauthorized immigration, some have questioned this understanding of the Citizenship Clause, and in particular the meaning of subject to the jurisdiction [of the United States]. This book traces the history of birthright citizenship under U.S. law and discusses some of the legislation in recent Congresses intended to alter it.
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Citizenship by Degree

Higher Education Policy and the Changing Gender Dynamics of American Citizenship

Author: Deondra Rose

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019065094X

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 7256

Since the mid-twentieth century, the United States has seen a striking shift in the gender dynamics of higher educational attainment as women have come to earn college degrees at higher rates than men. Women have also made significant strides in terms of socioeconomic status and political engagement. What explains the progress that American women have made since the 1960s? While many point to the feminist movement as the critical turning point, this book makes the case that women's movement toward first class citizenship has been shaped not only by important societal changes, but also by the actions of lawmakers who used a combination of redistributive and regulatory higher education policies to enhance women's incorporation into their roles as American citizens. Examining the development and impact of the National Defense Education Act of 1958, the Higher Education Act of 1965, and Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments, this book argues that higher education policies represent a crucial-though largely overlooked-factor shaping the progress that women have made. By significantly expanding women's access to college, they helped to pave the way for women to surpass men as the recipients of bachelor's degrees, while also empowering them to become more economically independent, socially integrated, politically engaged members of the American citizenry. In addition to helping to bring into greater focus our understanding of how Southern Democrats shaped U.S. social policy development during the mid-twentieth century, this analysis recognizes federal higher education policy as an indispensible component of the American welfare state.
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The Ethics of Immigration

Author: Joseph Carens

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199933839

Category: Philosophy

Page: 364

View: 8933

Eminent political theorist Joseph Carens tests the limits of democratic theory in the realm of immigration, arguing that any acceptable immigration policy must be based on moral principles even if it conflicts with the will of the majority.
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States Without Nations

Citizenship for Mortals

Author: Jacqueline Stevens

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231148771

Category: Philosophy

Page: 364

View: 8257

As citizens, we hold certain truths to be self-evident: that the rights to own land, marry, inherit property, and especially to assume birthright citizenship should be guaranteed by the state. The laws promoting these rights appear not only to preserve our liberty but to guarantee society remains just. Yet considering how much violence and inequality results from these legal mandates, Jacqueline Stevens asks whether we might be making the wrong assumptions. Would a world without such laws be more just? Arguing that the core laws of the nation-state are more about a fear of death than a desire for freedom, Jacqueline Stevens imagines a world in which birthright citizenship, family inheritance, state-sanctioned marriage, and private land ownership are eliminated. Would chaos be the result? Drawing on political theory and history and incorporating contemporary social and economic data, she brilliantly critiques our sentimental attachments to birthright citizenship, inheritance, and marriage and highlights their harmful outcomes, including war, global apartheid, destitution, family misery, and environmental damage. It might be hard to imagine countries without the rules of membership and ownership that have come to define them, but as Stevens shows, conjuring new ways of reconciling our laws with the condition of mortality reveals the flaws of our present institutions and inspires hope for moving beyond them.
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The Founders on Citizenship and Immigration

Principles and Challenges in America

Author: Edward J. Erler,Thomas G. West,John A. Marini

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742558557

Category: History

Page: 171

View: 2935

Working with the underlying premise that America's founding principles continue to be vital in the modern era, Erler, Marini, and West take a conservative look at immigration, one of today's most pressing political issues. Character the capacity to live a life befitting republican citizens is, as the Founders knew, crucial to the debate about immigration. The Founders on Citizenship and Immigration seeks to revive the issue of republican character in the current immigration debate and to elucidate the constitutional foundations of American citizenship. Published in cooperation with the Claremont Institute."
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The Condition, Elevation, Emigration, and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States

Author: Martin Robison Delany

Publisher: tredition

ISBN: 3847207970

Category: Fiction

Page: 160

View: 6489

This book is part of the TREDITION CLASSICS series. The creators of this series are united by passion for literature and driven by the intention of making all public domain books available in printed format again - worldwide. At tredition we believe that a great book never goes out of style. Several mostly non-profit literature projects provide content to tredition. To support their good work, tredition donates a portion of the proceeds from each sold copy. As a reader of a TREDITION CLASSICS book, you support our mission to save many of the amazing works of world literature from oblivion.
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Fragile Families

Foster Care, Immigration, and Citizenship

Author: Naomi Glenn-Levin Rodriguez

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812249380

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 5158

Fragile Families examines the precarious position of Latina/o families who are simultaneously caught up in systems of child welfare and immigration enforcement, focusing on the central role of child welfare decision-making in producing and maintaining boundaries of citizenship, race, and national belonging in the United States.
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The Children of Undocumented Immigrants

Author: David M. Haugen,Susan Musser

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN: 0737761601

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 104

View: 9670

The Migration Policy Institute released a fact sheet in 2016, stating that children born in the U.S. of a parent or parents who are undocumented immigrants, are placed at a severe disadvantage in life. This data was collected from 5.1 million children who are living with an unauthorized immigrant parent. Researchers found that these children are likely not to be enrolled in preschool, are likely to be held in a socioeconomic level that keeps them from developing and gaining access to resources, and are likely to fail in English proficiency that is necessary to move ahead in life. Place on top of that, the stress that their parent might be deported at any minute. These children are at risk, without a doubt. While U.S. policies on immigration and border control are hotly debated, this volume makes sure that we don't forget what's really at stake, the future of our young. Your readers are given the full breadth of perspectives on this topic, through eyewitness accounts, governmental views, scientific analysis, and newspaper accounts. Important details are pulled out from the text and presented in italicized font so that readers can track the facts, and refer to them for research and report writing. Most important of all, by reading balanced and well-researched entries, students will be able to form intelligent opinions on this pressing issue.
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Forced Removal

Causes and Effects of the Trail of Tears

Author: Heather E. Schwartz

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 1491420367

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 7018

"Explains the Trail of Tears, including its chronology, causes, and lasting effects"--
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All Bound Up Together

The Woman Question in African American Public Culture, 1830-1900

Author: Martha S. Jones

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807888902

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 7089

The place of women's rights in African American public culture has been an enduring question, one that has long engaged activists, commentators, and scholars. All Bound Up Together explores the roles black women played in their communities' social movements and the consequences of elevating women into positions of visibility and leadership. Martha Jones reveals how, through the nineteenth century, the "woman question" was at the core of movements against slavery and for civil rights. Unlike white women activists, who often created their own institutions separate from men, black women, Jones explains, often organized within already existing institutions--churches, political organizations, mutual aid societies, and schools. Covering three generations of black women activists, Jones demonstrates that their approach was not unanimous or monolithic but changed over time and took a variety of forms, from a woman's right to control her body to her right to vote. Through a far-ranging look at politics, church, and social life, Jones demonstrates how women have helped shape the course of black public culture.
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The Dred Scott Case

Author: Roger Brooke Taney,Israel Washburn,Horace Gray

Publisher: Sagwan Press

ISBN: 9781377281582

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 9293

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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The Struggle for Equal Adulthood

Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America

Author: Corinne T. Field

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469618141

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 5946

Struggle for Equal Adulthood: Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America
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