Asylums

Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates

Author: Erving Goffman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351327747

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 9590

A total institution is defined by Goffman as a place of residence and work where a large number of like-situated, individuals, cut off from the wider society for an appreciable period of time, together lead an enclosed, formally administered round of life. Prisons serve as a clear example, providing we appreciate that what is prison-like about prisons is found in institutions whose members have broken no laws. This volume deals with total institutions in general and, mental hospitals, in particular. The main focus is, on the world of the inmate, not the world of the staff. A chief concern is to develop a sociological version of the structure of the self. Each of the essays in this book were intended to focus on the same issue--the inmate's situation in an institutional context. Each chapter approaches the central issue from a different vantage point, each introduction drawing upon a different source in sociology and having little direct relation to the other chapters. This method of presenting material may be irksome, but it allows the reader to pursue the main theme of each paper analytically and comparatively past the point that would be allowable in chapters of an integrated book. If sociological concepts are to be treated with affection, each must be traced back to where it best applies, followed from there wherever it seems to lead, and pressed to disclose the rest of its family.
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Asylum

Author: Madeleine Roux

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0007538251

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 320

View: 740

The asylum holds the key to a terrifying past... A thrilling creepy photo-novel, perfect for fans of the New York Times bestseller Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children.
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Asylum

Author: Patrick McGrath

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307764443

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 6791

Patrick McGrath has created his most psychologically penetrating vision to date: a nightmare world rocked to its foundations by a passion of such force and intensity that it shatters the lives--and minds--of all who are touched by it. Stella Raphael, a woman of great beauty and formidable intelligence, is married to Max, a staid and unimaginative forensic psychiatrist. Max has taken a job in a huge top-security mental hospital in rural England, and Stella, far from London society, finds herself restless and bored. Into her lonely existence comes Edgar Stark, a brilliant sculptor confined to the hospital after killing his wife in a psychotic rage. He comes to Stella's garden to rebuild an old Victorian conservatory there, and Stella cannot ignore her overwhelming physical attraction to this desperate man. Their explosive affair pits them against Stella's husband, her child, and the entire institution. When the crisis comes to a head, Stella makes a decision--one that will destroy several lives and precipitate an appalling tragedy that could only be fueled by illicit sexual love. Asylum is a terrifying exploration of the extremes to which erotic obsession can drive us. Patrick McGrath brings his own dazzling blend of cool artistry and visceral engagement to this mesmerizing story of a fatal love and its unspeakably tragic aftermath. And in Stella Raphael, a woman who tears down the walls of her constricted existence to pursue a dangerous passion, he has created a character who will long be remembered for her willingness to take the ultimate risk, even if she must pay the ultimate price.
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Closing the Asylums

Causes and Consequences of the Deinstitutionalization Movement

Author: George Paulson, M.D.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 078649266X

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 9630

"Though closing the asylums promised more freedom for many, encouraged community acceptance, and enhanced outpatient opportunities, there were unintended consequences. This book is written from the point of view of an academic neurologist who has served 60 years as an employee or consultant in typical state mental institutions in North Carolina and Ohio"--Provided by publisher.
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Asylum

Inside the Closed World of State Mental Hospitals

Author: Christopher Payne,Oliver W. Sacks

Publisher: Mit Press

ISBN: 9780262013499

Category: Medical

Page: 209

View: 7631

Powerful photographs of the grand exteriors and crumbling interiors of America's abandoned state mental hospitals.
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Haunted Asylums, Prisons, and Sanatoriums

Inside the Abandoned Institutions for the Crazy, Criminal & Quarantined

Author: Jamie Davis

Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide

ISBN: 073873750X

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 212

View: 1079

Recounts supernatural encounters from ten well-known U.S. institutions, including West Virginia Penitentiary and St. Albans Sanatorium, in a work that features photographs, highlights from site tours, and historical information.
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Asylum

A survivor’s flight from Nazi-occupied Vienna through wartime France

Author: Moriz Scheyer

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1782832297

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 202

View: 7437

In 1943, hidden by the Resistance in a French convent, Moriz Scheyer began drafting an account of his wartime experiences: a tense, moving, at times almost miraculous story of flight and persecution in Austria and France. As arts editor of Vienna's principal newspaper before the German annexation of Austria, Scheyer had known the city's great artists, including Stefan Zweig and Gustav Mahler, and was himself an important literary journalist. In this book he brings his distinctive critical and emotional voice to bear on his own extraordinary experiences: Vienna at the Anschluss; Paris immediately pre-war and under Nazi occupation; the 'Exodus'; two periods of incarceration in French concentration camps; contact with the Resistance; a failed attempt at escape to Switzerland; and a dramatic rescue followed by clandestine life in a mental asylum run by Franciscan nuns. Completed in 1945, Scheyer's memoir is remarkable not just for the riveting events that it recounts, but as a near-unique survivor's perspective from that time.
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Women of the Asylum

Voices from Behind the Walls, 1840-1945

Author: Jeffrey L. Geller,Maxine Harris

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 349

View: 6192

Accounts by women placed in asylums from 1840 to 1945 provide a chilling study of psychiatric institutions and attitudes toward women
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Theaters of Madness

Insane Asylums and Nineteenth-Century American Culture

Author: Benjamin Reiss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226709655

Category: Psychology

Page: 240

View: 5922

In the mid-1800s, a utopian movement to rehabilitate the insane resulted in a wave of publicly funded asylums—many of which became unexpected centers of cultural activity. Housed in magnificent structures with lush grounds, patients participated in theatrical programs, debating societies, literary journals, schools, and religious services. Theaters of Madness explores both the culture these rich offerings fomented and the asylum’s place in the fabric of nineteenth-century life, reanimating a time when the treatment of the insane was a central topic in debates over democracy, freedom, and modernity. Benjamin Reiss explores the creative lives of patients and the cultural demands of their doctors. Their frequently clashing views turned practically all of American culture—from blackface minstrel shows to the works of William Shakespeare—into a battlefield in the war on insanity. Reiss also shows how asylums touched the lives and shaped the writing of key figures, such as Emerson and Poe, who viewed the system alternately as the fulfillment of a democratic ideal and as a kind of medical enslavement. Without neglecting this troubling contradiction, Theaters of Madness prompts us to reflect on what our society can learn from a generation that urgently and creatively tried to solve the problem of mental illness.
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Insanity and Insane Asylums

Author: Edward Jarvis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Insanity (Law)

Page: 40

View: 9743

Insanity and Insane Asylums was first printed in the Western Medical Journal, principally to call attention to the curability of this disorder and to show what may be done for the mentally ill, here as well as elsewhere.
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Asylums, Mental Health Care and the Irish

1800-2010

Author: Pauline M. Prior

Publisher: Irish Academic Press

ISBN: 1911024620

Category: History

Page: 355

View: 7725

This book is a collection of studies on mental health services in Ireland from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present day. Essays cover overall trends in patient numbers, an exploration of the development of mental health law in Ireland, and studies on individual hospitals – all of which provide incredible insight into times past and yet speak volumes about mental health in contemporary Irish society. Topics include the famous nursing strike at Monaghan Asylum in 1919, when a red flag was raised over the building; extracts from Speedwell, a hospital newsletter, showing the social and sporting life at Holywell Hospital during the 1960s; an exploration of diseases such as beriberi and tuberculosis at Dundrum and the Richmond in the 1890s; the problems encountered by doctors in Ballinasloe Asylum as they tried to exert their authority over the Governors; and the experiences of Irish emigrants who found themselves in asylums in Australia and New Zealand. The book also includes a discussion of mental health services in Ireland 1959–2010, the first time such a chronology has been published. The editor, Pauline Prior, and the contributors, including Brendan Kelly, Dermot Walsh, Elizabeth Malcolm and E.M. Crawford, are well-known scholars within the disciplines of medicine, sociology and history, coming together for the first time to present an essential book on the history of mental health services in Ireland.
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The Asylum

The Renegades Who Hijacked the World's Oil Market

Author: Leah McGrath Goodman

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780062042323

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 432

View: 5782

The Asylum is a stunning exposé by a seasoned Wall Street journalist that once and for all reveals the truth behind America’s oil addiction in all its unscripted and dysfunctional glory. In the tradition of Too Big to Fail and Liar’s Poker, author Leah McGrath Goodman tells the amazing-but-true story of a band of struggling, hardscrabble traders who, after enduring decades of scorn from New York’s stuffy financial establishment, overcame more than a century of failure, infighting, and brinksmanship to build the world’s reigning oil empire—entirely by accident.
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Escape from Asylum

Author: Madeleine Roux

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062424440

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 352

View: 2009

In this terrifying prequel novel to the New York Times bestselling Asylum series, a teen is wrongfully committed to the Brookline psychiatric hospital and must find a way out—before he becomes the next victim of the evil warden’s experiments. With the page-turning suspense and unsettling found photographs from real asylums that led Publishers Weekly to call Asylum “a strong YA debut,” Escape from Asylum is perfect for fans of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. The nightmare is just beginning. Ricky Desmond has been through this all before. If he could just get through to his mother, he could convince her that he doesn’t belong at Brookline. From the man who thinks he can fly to the woman who killed her husband, the other patients are nothing like him; all he did was lose his temper just a little bit, just the once. But when Ricky is selected by the sinister Warden Crawford for a very special program—a program that the warden claims will not cure him but perfect him—Ricky realizes that he may not be able to wait for his mom a second longer. With the help of a sympathetic nurse and a fellow patient, Ricky needs to escape now. Set long before Dan, Abby, and Jordan ever walked the hallways of the Brookline asylum—back when it was still a functioning psych ward and not a dorm—Escape from Asylum is a mind-bending and scary installment in the Asylum series that can stand on its own for new readers or provide missing puzzle pieces for series fans. Don't miss Madeleine Roux's all-new gothic horror novel, House of Furies.
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Prisons, Asylums, and the Public

Institutional Visiting in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Janet Miron

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802095135

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 3635

The prisons and asylums of Canada and the United States were a popular destination for institutional tourists in the nineteenth-century. Thousands of visitors entered their walls, recording and describing the interiors, inmates, and therapeutic and reformative practices they encountered in letters, diaries, and articles. Surprisingly, the vast majority of these visitors were not members of the medical or legal elite but were ordinary people. Prisons, Asylums, and the Public argues that, rather than existing in isolation, these institutions were closely connected to the communities beyond their walls. Challenging traditional interpretations of public visiting, Janet Miron examines the implications and imperatives of visiting from the perspectives of officials, the public, and the institutionalized. Finding that institutions could be important centres of civic activity, self-edification, and 'scientific' study, Prisons, Asylums, and the Public sheds new light on popular nineteenth-century attitudes towards the insane and the criminal.
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The Last Asylum

A Memoir of Madness in Our Times

Author: Barbara Taylor

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022627408X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5560

In the late 1970s, Barbara Taylor, then an acclaimed young historian, began to suffer from severe anxiety. In the years that followed, Taylor’s world contracted around her illness. Eventually, her struggles were severe enough to lead to her admission to what had once been England’s largest psychiatric institution, the infamous Friern Mental Hospital in North London. The Last Asylum is Taylor’s breathtakingly blunt and brave account of those years. In it, Taylor draws not only on her experience as a historian, but also, more importantly, on her own lived history at Friern— once known as the Colney Hatch Lunatic Asylum and today the site of a luxury apartment complex. Taylor was admitted to Friern in July 1988, not long before England’s asylum system began to undergo dramatic change: in a development that was mirrored in America, the 1990s saw the old asylums shuttered, their patients left to plot courses through a perpetually overcrowded and underfunded system of community care. But Taylor contends that the emptying of the asylums also marked a bigger loss, a loss of community. She credits her own recovery to the help of a steadfast psychoanalyst and a loyal circle of friends— from Magda, Taylor’s manic-depressive roommate, to Fiona, who shares tips for navigating the system and stories of her boyfriend, the “Spaceman,” and his regular journeys to Saturn. The forging of that network of support and trust was crucial to Taylor’s recovery, offering a respite from the “stranded, homeless feelings” she and others found in the outside world. A vivid picture of mental health treatment at a moment of epochal change, The Last Asylum is also a moving meditation on Taylor’s own experience, as well as that of millions of others who struggle with mental illness.
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Second Home

Orphan Asylums and Poor Families in America

Author: Timothy A. Hacsi

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674796447

Category: Social Science

Page: 297

View: 5314

As orphan asylums ceased to exist in the late twentieth century, interest in them dwindled as well. Yet, from the Civil War to the Great Depression, America's dependent children--children whose families were unable to care for them--received more aid from orphan asylums than from any other means. This important omission in the growing literature on poverty in America is addressed in Second Home. As Timothy Hacsi shows, most children in nineteenth-century orphan asylums were "half-orphans," children with one living parent who was unable to provide for them. The asylums spread widely and endured because different groups--churches, ethnic communities, charitable organizations, fraternal societies, and local and state governments--could adapt them to their own purposes. In the 1890s, critics began to argue that asylums were overcrowded and impersonal. By 1909, advocates called for aid to destitute mothers, and argued that asylums should be a last resort, for short-term care only. Yet orphanages continued to care for most dependent children until the depression strained asylum budgets and federally-funded home care became more widely available. Yet some, Catholic asylums in particular, cared for poor children into the 1950s and 1960s. At a time when the American welfare state has failed to provide for all needy children, understanding our history in this area could be an important step toward correcting that failure.
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Madhouse

The Hidden History of Insane Asylums in 19th Century New York

Author: Michael T Keene

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780998850825

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 9050

The history of 15 Insane asylums established in 19th century New York as told through the experiences of the directors, staff, and patients who inhabited them.
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The Man Who Closed the Asylums

Franco Basaglia and the Revolution in Mental Health Care

Author: John Foot

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1781689288

Category: Political Science

Page: 424

View: 5166

When the wind of the 1960s blew through the world of psychiatry In 1961, when Franco Basaglia arrived outside the grim walls of the Gorizia asylum, on the Italian border with Yugoslavia, it was a place of horror, a Bedlam for the mentally sick and excluded, redolent of Basaglia’s own wartime experience inside a fascist gaol. Patients were frequently restrained for long periods, and therapy was largely a matter of electric and insulin shocks. The corridors stank, and for many of the interned the doors were locked for life. This was a concentration camp, not a hospital. Basaglia, the new Director, was expected to practise all the skills of oppression in which he had been schooled, but he would have none of this. The place had to be closed down by opening it up from the inside, bringing freedom and democracy to the patients, the nurses and the psychiatrists working in that “total institution.” Inspired by the writings of authors such as Primo Levi, R.D. Laing, Erving Goffman, Michel Foucault and Frantz Fanon, and the practices of experimental therapeutic communities in the UK, Basaglia’s seminal work as a psychiatrist and campaigner in Gorizia, Parma and Trieste fed into and substantially contributed to the national and international movement of 1968. In 1978 a law was passed (the “Basaglia law”) which sanctioned the closure of the entire Italian asylum system. The first comprehensive study of this revolutionary approach to mental health care, The Man Who Closed the Asylums is a gripping account of one of the most influential movements in twentieth-century psychiatry, which helped to transform the way we see mental illness. Basaglia’s work saved countless people from a miserable existence, and his legacy persists, as an object lesson in the struggle against the brutality and ignorance that the establishment peddles to the public as common sense. From the Hardcover edition.
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Cure, Comfort and Safe Custody

Public Lunatic Asylums in Early Nineteenth-Century England

Author: Leonard Smith

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780718500948

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 6950

Explores the evolving tensions between the three objectives of the English mental asylum from 1808 to 1845: custody, cure, and comfort. Smith (arts and social sciences, U. of Birmingham, UK) finds that the implicit goal of custody, evidenced in penitentiary-style regimes, was gradually superseded by an Enlightenment-tempered movement towards cure. However, eventually the flaws in the system led to an overcrowding by ever larger numbers of physically deteriorated, aging people, and the emphasis switched to comfort.
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Gender and Class in English Asylums, 1890-1914

Author: L. Hide

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137321431

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5825

An unprecedented number of people were sent to 'lunatic asylums' in the nineteenth century. But what was life like inside? How was order maintained? And why were so many doctors on the verge of a breakdown themselves? This book provides a glimpse into the lives of patients and staff inside two London asylums at the turn of the twentieth century.
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