Archaeology of the War of 1812

Author: Michael Lucas,Julie M Schablitsky

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1611328837

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 3155

This is the first summary of archaeological contributions to our understanding of the War of 1812 by examining recent excavations and field surveys on fortifications, encampments, landscapes, shipwrecks, and battles in the different regions of the United States and Canada.
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A Fully Accredited Ocean

Essays on the Great Lakes

Author: Victoria Brehm

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472107094

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 249

View: 8149

What was daily life like for a sailor in the War of 1812? How was his ship constructed? What allowed some shipping companies to survive in the harsh world of early unrestrained competition on the Great Lakes while many others failed? What sorts of stories did common sailors write about sailing the lakes? Such questions form the basis of this multifaceted collection of essays, "A Fully Accredited Ocean, " edited by Victoria Brehm. The issues presented here address the fundamentals of existence of life on the lakes for a period of nearly two centuries. These essays bring to light some of the massive disruptions that affected the Great Lakes region as it became one of the most industrialized areas on the continent. The essayists explore the culture of the lakes through the archaeological investigation of the War of 1812 brig Jefferson, women on the lakes, fishing crafts of Isle Royale, and through personal narrative that touches on the competing concerns of occupational fishers, sports enthusiasts, lake biologists, and the state. Victoria Brehm is Assistant Professor of English, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Michigan.
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Coffins of the Brave

Lake Shipwrecks of the War of 1812

Author: Kevin J. Crisman

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623490324

Category: History

Page: 415

View: 7040

In Coffins of the Brave: Lake Shipwrecks of the War of 1812, archaeologist Kevin J. Crisman and his fellow contributors examine sixteen different examples of 1812-era naval and commercial shipbuilding. They range from four small prewar vessels to four 16- or 20-gun brigs, three warships of much greater size, a steamboat hull converted into an armed schooner, two gunboats, and two postwar schooners. Despite their differing degrees of preservation and archaeological study, each vessel reveals something about how its creators sought the best balance of strength, durability, capacity, stability, speed, weatherliness, and seaworthiness for the anticipated naval struggle on the lakes along the US-Canadian border. The underwater archaeology reported here has guided a new approach to understanding the events of 1812–15, one that blends the evidence in contemporary documents and images with a wealth of details derived from objects lost, discarded, and otherwise left behind. This heavily illustrated volume balances scholarly findings with lively writing, interjecting the adventure of working on shipwrecks and archaeological finds into the investigation and interpretation of a war that continues to attract interest two centuries after it was fought.
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The Archaeology of Gender

Separating the Spheres in Urban America

Author: Diana diZerga Wall

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 148991210X

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 8309

Historical archaeologists often become so involved in their potsherd patterns they seldom have time or energy left to address the broader processes responsi ble for the material culture patterns they recognize. Some ofus haveurged our colleagues to use the historical record as a springboard from which to launch hypotheses with which to better understand the behavioral and cultural pro cesses responsible for the archaeological record. Toooften, this urging has re sulted in reports designed like a sandwich, having a slice of "historical back ground," followed by a totally different "archaeological record," and closed with a weevil-ridden slice of "interpretation" of questionable nutritive value for understanding the past. The reader is often left to wonder what the archae ological meat had to do with either slice of bread, since the connection be tween the documented history and the material culture is left to the reader's imagination, and the connection between the interpretation and the other disparate parts is tenuous at best. The plethora of stale archaeological sandwiches in the literature has re sulted at the methodological level from a too-narrow focus on the specific history and archaeology ofa site and the individuals involvedon it, rather than a focus on the explanation of broader processes of culture to which the actors and events at the site-specific level responded.
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Snake Hill

An Investigation of a Military Cemetery from the War of 1812

Author: Susan Pfeiffer,Ronald E. Williamson

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 1459715802

Category: History

Page: 443

View: 661

In 1987, skeletal remains were encountered during excavation just west of Old Fort Erie, in Ontario’s Niagara Peninsula. While possession of the land had been bitterly contested in 1814, it remained virtually undeveloped and only in the 1980s, with the construction of permanent homes, did excavations yield evidence of the distant past. An international team of scholars and scientists investigated the remains and identified the individuals’ nationalities for repatriation, where appropriate. The resulting archaeological dig has proven crucial to our understanding of the siege of Fort Erie, and provided new information about military clothing, personal gear, medical science, and other details of the day-to-day life of a soldier living under battlefield conditions during the War of 1812. Snake Hill provides a detailed account of this investigation, documenting an important story of suffering and carnage, and providing the reader with a rare glimpse at life and death during the War of 1812. This book contributes significantly to our understanding of events before, during and after Fort Erie’s 1814 siege.
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Indians and Archaeology of Missouri, Revised Edition

Author: Carl H. Chapman,Eleanor F. Chapman

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826273157

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 3442

This expanded edition of Indians and Archaeology of Missouri gives an excellent introduction to the cultural development of Missouri’s Indians during the past twelve thousand years. Providing a new chapter on the Hunter Foragers of the Dalton period and substantial revision of other chapters to incorporate recent discoveries, the Chapmans present knowledge based upon decades of experience with archaeological excavations in an understandable and fascinating form. The first edition of Indians and Archaeology of Missouri has been recognized in Missouri and nationally as one of the best books of its kind. The Missouri Historical Review called it “simply indispensable.” The Plains Anthropologist added similar praise: “Clearly written and exceptionally well illustrated...it is the answer to the amateur’s prayers.” Archaeology described it as “a boon to Missouri’s many amateur archaeologists, a useful source of information for professionals and interesting reading for the layman.”
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Flotilla

the Patuxent naval campaign in the War of 1812

Author: Donald Shomette

Publisher: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 8323

"The War of 1812 saw the Royal Navy wreak havoc on Chesapeake Bay, nearly destroying the region's economy. An American naval force was scraped together. Capt. Joshua Barney's Chesapeake Flotilla, with great gallantry, challenged the better-equipped British. Although it was ultimately defeated, its efforts were not in vain. Marine archaeologist Shomette, who directed excavation of the flotilla's flagship, here revises a book he originally published in 1981 and includes further information on the officers, crew, and boats making up the flotilla and on the region's experience of war. This is detailed history for serious readers on the subject."--Library Journal.
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Im Herzen der See

Die letzte Fahrt des Walfängers Essex

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick

Publisher: Heyne Verlag

ISBN: 3641146631

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 2384

Die wahre Geschichte hinter dem Klassiker Moby Dick – verfilmt mit Starbesetzung Was jetzt als »Major Motion Picture« in die Kinos kommt – produziert von Oscar-Preisträger Ron Howard (A Beautiful Mind – Genie und Wahnsinn) –, hat schon als Buch seine Leser gefesselt. Nathaniel Philbrick erzählt die wahre Geschichte jener Ereignisse, die Herman Melville zu seinem Roman Moby Dick inspiriert haben: Im November 1820 wird der Walfänger Essex mitten auf dem Pazifik von einem Pottwal gerammt. Das Schiff kentert, doch die 20 Mann starke Besatzung kann sich auf drei kleine Beiboote retten. Knapp 4000 Kilometer westlich der südamerikanischen Küste beginnt für die Männer eine beispiellose Odyssee: Drei Monate lang segeln sie in offenen, notdürftig aufgetakelten Booten und ohne ausreichend Proviant über eine feindliche See – und stoßen dabei an die Grenzen ihrer Menschlichkeit.
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Huts and History

The Historical Archaeology of Military Encampment During the American Civil War

Author: Clarence R. Geier,David Gerald Orr,Matthew B. Reeves

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813029412

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 7289

The American Civil War soldier, confined much of the time to his camp, suffered from boredom and sickness. Encampment was not only tedious but detrimental to his health; far more soldiers died of diseases from sharing close quarters with their comrades than from wounds on the battlefield. Until now, archaeologists have concentrated their study on the battle sites and overlooked the importance of the camps. This edited collection is the first dedicated to the archaeology of Civil War encampments. The authors contend that intensive study to interpret and preserve these sites will help to ensure their protection as well as expand our understanding of the 19th-century soldier's life. Whether they mobilized tens of thousands of men for training or taught maneuvers to smaller groups, encampments are significant in several ways: as "cultural landscapes" characterized by architectural features, as socially and politically organized "mobile communities," and as infrastructures created to support soldiers' needs. The authors' techniques can be applied to camps not only of the Civil War but the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Indian campaign.
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Bioarchaeology

Interpreting Behavior from the Human Skeleton

Author: Clark Spencer Larsen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521658348

Category: History

Page: 461

View: 2163

Comprehensive reference to use of human bones and teeth in interpreting past lives.
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Journal of the Indian Wars Volume 1, Number 2

Battles & Leaders - The Indian Wars East of the Mississippi

Author: Michael Hughes

Publisher: Savas Publishing

ISBN: 1940669200

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 8431

Journal of the Indian Wars, or JIW was a quarterly publication on the study of the American Indian Wars. Before JIW, no periodical dedicated exclusively to this fascinating topic was available. JIW's focus was on warfare in the United States, Canada, and the Spanish borderlands from 1492 to 1890. Published articles also include personalities, policy, and military technologies. JIW was designed to satisfy both professional and lay readers with original articles of lasting value and a variety of columns of interest, plus book reviews, all enhanced with maps and illustrations. JIW's lengthy essays of substance are presented in a fresh and entertaining manner. This issue is dedicated to battles and leaders of the early United States east of the Mississippi River. Eastern battles remain the most obscure in the history of the Indian conflicts, and those fought in the "Old Southeast" are the most obscure of all. This issue includes the following topics: Editor's Forward Prelude to Horseshoe's Bend: The Battles of Emuckfaw and Enotochopco "The Carnage was Dreadful": The Battle of Horseshoe Bend The Blackhawk War Reconsidered: A New Interpretation of its Causes and Consequences William Clark's Journal of Maj. Gen. Anthony's Wayne's 1794 Campaign Against the Indians in Ohio "'Fighting the Flames of a Merciless War': Secretary of War Henry Knox and the Indian War in the Old Northwest," 1790-1795 The Battle of Fallen Timbers: An Historical Perspective Interview: A Conversation with Archaeologist G. Michael Pratt Captain Albert Barnitz and the Battle of the Washita: New Documents, New Insights Features: The Tippacanoe Battlefield and Museum The Indian Wars: Organizational, Tribal, and Museum News Thomas Online: A Beginner's Guide to Indian Wars Research on the Web Book Reviews Index
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Archaeology at the Millennium

A Sourcebook

Author: Gary M. Feinman,T. Douglas Price

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387726101

Category: History

Page: 508

View: 5069

In this book, internationally distinguished contributors consider hot topics in turn-of-the-millennium archaeology and chart an ambitious agenda for the future.
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Searching for the Forgotten War - 1812 Canada

Author: Timothy L. Sanford,Patrick Richard Carstens

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1453588922

Category: History

Page: 616

View: 1046

The quest to write a geographical book leading up to the two-hundredth anniversary of this conflict, known as the War of 1812, that created two North American countries we enjoy today, began in 2006, with the goal to visit as many historical sites as possible. We started searching for roadside markers, plaques, monuments, cemeteries, the tombstones to the fallen, fortifications, battlefields and those who fought in this war, and to tell the readers the stories behind them. Searching for the Forgotten War 1812, was an experience that was more than we expected in terms of the wonderful people we met along the way.
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Death at Snake Hill

Author: Paul Litt,Ronald F. Williamson,Joseph W.A. Whitehorne

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 1550021869

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 4356

A revealing parable of the conflicts that arise when pressures for land development collide with heritage conservation.
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An Archaeology of History and Tradition

Moments of Danger in the Annapolis Landscape

Author: Christopher N. Matthews

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461505410

Category: Social Science

Page: 162

View: 6416

As the foundations of the modern world were being laid at the beginning of the 19th century, Annapolis, Maryland, identified itself as the Ancient City. This unusual appellation has served Annapolis into the present as a city that has consistently defined and redefined for itself what being ancient means. The process of historical recognition and preservation that has played out in Annapolis provides valuable insights into the way modern Americans in general have come to know and use the past. Though often conceived to be in opposition, modernity and tradition can be paired as cultural strategies that allow the modern world to be articulated with the tradition it hoped to replace. The multiple histories and historic landscapes derived from archaeological investigations in Annapolis are presented to show that the physical world below the surface of the city has been defined by constructions of modernity in tandem with the survival of certain traditions.
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The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial

Author: Sarah Tarlow,Liv Nilsson Stutz

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191650390

Category: Social Science

Page: 872

View: 5668

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial reviews the current state of mortuary archaeology and its practice, highlighting its often contentious place in the modern socio-politics of archaeology. It contains forty-four chapters which focus on the history of the discipline and its current scientific techniques and methods. Written by leading, international scholars in the field, it derives its examples and case studies from a wide range of time periods, such as the middle palaeolithic to the twentieth century, and geographical areas which include Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Combining up-to-date knowledge of relevant archaeological research with critical assessments of the theme and an evaluation of future research trajectories, it draws attention to the social, symbolic, and theoretical aspects of interpreting mortuary archaeology. The volume is well-illustrated with maps, plans, photographs, and illustrations and is ideally suited for students and researchers.
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The Sangamo Frontier

History and Archaeology in the Shadow of Lincoln

Author: Robert Mazrim

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226514234

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 4719

When Abraham Lincoln moved to Illinois’ Sangamo Country in 1831, he found a pioneer community transforming from a cluster of log houses along an ancient trail to a community of new towns and state roads. But two of the towns vanished in a matter of years, and many of the activities and lifestyles that shaped them were almost entirely forgotten. In The Sangamo Frontier, archaeologist Robert Mazrim unearths the buried history of this early American community, breathing new life into a region that still rests in Lincoln’s shadow. Named after a shallow river that cuts through the prairies of central Illinois, the Sangamo Country—an area that now encompasses the capital city of Springfield and present-day Sangamon County—was first colonized after the War of 1812. For the past fifteen years, Mazrim has conducted dozens of excavations there, digging up pieces of pioneer life, from hand-forged iron and locally made crockery to pewter spoons and Staffordshire teacups. And here, in beautifully illustrated stories of each dig, he shows how each of these small artifacts can teach us something about the lifestyles of people who lived on the frontier nearly two hundred years ago. Allowing us to see past the changed modern landscape and the clichés of pioneer history, Mazrim deftly uses his findings to portray the homes, farms, taverns, and pottery shops where Lincoln’s neighbors once lived and worked. Drawing readers into the thrill of discovery, The Sangamo Frontier inaugurates a new kind of archaeological history that both enhances and challenges our written history. It imbues today’s landscape with an authentic ghostliness that will reawaken the curiosity of anyone interested in the forgotten people and places that helped shape our nation.
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The British Raid on Essex

The Forgotten Battle of the War of 1812

Author: Jerry Roberts

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819574775

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 9638

This is the dynamic account of one of the most destructive maritime actions to take place in Connecticut history: the 1814 British attack on the privateers of Pettipaug, known today as the British Raid on Essex. During the height of the War of 1812, 136 Royal marines and sailors made their way up the Connecticut River from warships anchored in Long Island Sound. Guided by a well-paid American traitor the British navigated the Saybrook shoals and advanced up the river under cover of darkness. By the time it was over, the British had burned twenty-seven American vessels, including six newly built privateers. It was the largest single maritime loss of the war. Yet this story has been virtually left out of the history books—the forgotten battle of the forgotten war. This new account from author and historian Jerry Roberts is the definitive overview of this event and includes a wealth of new information drawn from recent research and archaeological finds. Lavish illustrations and detailed maps bring the battle to life.
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The Archaeology of Engagement

Conflict and Revolution in the United States

Author: Dana Lee Pertermann,Holly Kathryn Norton

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623492955

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 4238

When a historic battlefield site is discovered and studied, the focus is often on the “hardware”: remnants of weaponry, ammunition, supplies, and equipment that archaeologists carefully unearth, analyze, conserve, and frequently place on display in museums. But what about the “software”? What can archaeology teach us about the humans involved in the conflict: their social mores and cultural assumptions; their use and understanding of power? In The Archaeology of Engagement: Conflict and Revolution in the United States, Dana L. Pertermann and Holly K. Norton have assembled a collection of studies that includes sites of conflicts between groups of widely divergent cultures, such as Robert E. Lee's mid-1850s campaign along the Concho River and the battles of the River Raisin during the War of 1812. Notably, the second half of the book applies the editors’ principles of conflict event theory to the San Jacinto Battlefield in Texas, forming a case study of one of America's most storied—and heavily trafficked—battle sites.
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Geschichte der amerikanischen Indianer

besonders der am Missisippi, an Ost- und Westflorida, Georgien, Süd- und Nord-Karolina und Virginien angrenzenden Nationen, nebst einem Anhange

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Indians

Page: 419

View: 9549

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