Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida

Author: Jerald T. Milanich

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813012728

Category: Social Science

Page: 476

View: 8286

In a richly illustrated book that will appeal to professional and avocational archaeologists, scholars, tourists, and local history buffs, Milanich introduces the material heritage of the first Floridians through the interpretation of artifacts and archaeological sites.
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New Histories of Pre-Columbian Florida

Author: Neill J. Wallis,Asa R. Randall

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813062099

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 8436

This volume aims to bring the archaeological study of Florida's Pre-Columbian past up to date, using new techniques, technologies and data to reveal that the Pre-Columbian natives were not isolated and environmentally segregated, as was previously thought.
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Florida's Indians from Ancient Times to the Present

Author: Jerald T. Milanich

Publisher: Native Peoples, Cultures, and

ISBN: 9780813015989

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 493

"An exceptional book for popular consumption. . . . It is a wonderful synthesis, and will be avidly read by both professional archaeologists and the general public."--Marvin T. Smith, Valdosta State University Florida's Indians tells the story of the native societies that have lived in Florida for twelve millennia, from the early hunters at the end of the Ice Age to the modern Seminole, Miccosukee, and Creeks. When the first Indians arrived in what is now Florida, they wrested their livelihood from a land far different from the modern countryside, one that was cooler, drier, and almost twice the size. Thousands of years later European explorers encountered literally hundreds of different Indian groups living in every part of the state. (Today every Florida county contains an Indian archaeological site.) The arrival of colonists brought the native peoples a new world and great changes took place--by the mid-1700s, through warfare, slave raids, and especially epidemics, the population was almost annihilated. Other Indians soon moved into the state, including Creeks from Georgia and Alabama, who were the ancestors of the modern Seminole and Miccosukee Indians. Written for a general audience, this book is lavishly illustrated with full-color drawings and photographs. It skillfully integrates the latest archaeological and historical information about the Sunshine State's Native Americans, connecting the past and present with modern place-names, and it gives a proud voice to Florida's rich Indian heritage. Jerald T. Milanich, curator in archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, is the author of Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe (UPF, 1995) and Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida (UPF, 1994), among numerous other books.
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Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe

Author: Jerald T. Milanich

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813016368

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2958

When the conquistadors arrived in Florida as many as 350,000 native Americans lived there. Two and a half centuries later, Florida's Indians were gone. This text focuses on these native peoples and their lives, and attempts to explain what happened to them.
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Late Prehistoric Florida

Archaeology at the Edge of the Mississippian World

Author: Keith Ashley,Nancy Marie White

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813061870

Category: History

Page: 412

View: 7952

Prehistoric Florida societies, particularly those of the peninsula, have been largely ignored or given only minor consideration in overviews of the Mississippian southeast (A.D. 1000-1600). This groundbreaking volume lifts the veil of uniformity frequently draped over these regions in the literature, providing the first comprehensive examination of Mississippi-period archaeology in the state. Featuring contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the field, this collection describes and synthesizes the latest data from excavations throughout Florida. In doing so, it reveals a diverse and vibrant collection of cleared-field maize farmers, part-time gardeners, hunter-gatherers, and coastal and riverine fisher/shellfish collectors who formed a distinctive part of the Mississippian southeast.
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Archeology of the Florida Gulf Coast

Author: Gordon Randolph Willey

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813016030

Category: History

Page: 599

View: 7938

"By the end of 1950, only about a dozen publications in American archaeology might be said to stand as monumental contributions from the points of view of prodigious industry, presentation of new data, good organization, balanced interpretation, and clear writing. Of these, the reviewer regards Gordon Willey's great volume on the Florida Gulf Coast as perhaps the best of all."--American Antiquity "Gordon Willey's Archeology of the Florida Gulf Coast literally set the agenda for archaeological research in north Florida. . . . It forms the basis for our understanding of the prehistoric period in this area. . . . It is impossible to do research in the Gulf Coast region without it."--Charles R. Ewen, East Carolina University Fifty years after its first publication by the Smithsonian Institution, this landmark work is back in print. Written by the dean of North and South American archaeologists, Gordon Willey, the book initially marked a new phase in archaeological research. It continues to offer a major synthesis of the archaeology of the Florida Gulf Coast, with complete descriptions and illustrations of all the pottery types found in the area. The book contains data that remain indispensable to archaeologists working in every region or state east of the Mississippi River. Nowhere else can the reader find as compact, and at the same time as detailed, a summary of the numerous ceramic types upon which Gulf Florida archaeological chronology is based. It includes an overview of all the work early archaeologists did in the area from the 1800s up through the time of the federal relief archaeology programs of the 1930s, and it has become the foundation upon which all subsequent research in the Gulf area has been constructed. Gordon R. Willey, Bowditch Professor Emeritus of Harvard University, is former curator of anthropology at the Harvard Peabody Museum.
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The Archaeology of Traditions

Agency and History Before and After Columbus

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Orange Groove Books

ISBN: 9781616101299

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 2661

"At last, southeastern archaeology as history of people, not just 'cultures'."--Patricia Galloway, Mississippi Department of Archives and History Rich with the objects of the day-to-day lives of illiterate or common people in the southeastern United States, this book offers an archaeological reevaluation of history itself: where it is, what it is, and how it came to be. Through clothing, cooking, eating, tool making, and other mundane forms of social expression and production, traditions were altered daily in encounters between missionaries and natives, between planters and slaves, and between native leaders and native followers. As this work demonstrates, these "unwritten texts" proved to be potent ingredients in the larger-scale social and political events that shaped how peoples, cultures, and institutions came into being. These developments point to a common social process whereby men and women negotiated about their views of the world and--whether slaves, natives, or Europeans--created history. Bridging the pre-Columbian and colonial past, this book incorporates current theories that cut across disciplines to appeal to anthropologists, historians, and archaeologists. CONTENTS 1. A New Tradition in Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat 2. African-American Tradition and Community in the Antebellum South, by Brian W. Thomas 3. Resistance and Accommodation in Apalachee Province, by John F. Scarry 4. Manipulating Bodies and Emerging Traditions at the Los Adaes Presidio, by Diana DiPaolo Loren 5. Negotiated Tradition? Native American Pottery in the Mission Period in La Florida, by Rebecca Saunders 6. Creek and Pre-Creek Revisited, by Cameron B. Wesson 7. Gender, Tradition, and the Negotiation of Power Relationships in Southern Appalachian Chiefdoms, by Lynne P. Sullivan and Christopher B. Rodning 8. Historical Science or Silence? Toward a Historical Anthropology of Mississippian Political Culture, by Mark A. Rees 9. Cahokian Change and the Authority of Tradition, by Susan M. Alt 10. The Historical-Processual Development of Late Woodland Societies, by Michael S. Nassaney 11. A Tradition of Discontinuity: American Bottom Early and Middle Woodland Culture History Reexamined, by Andrew C. Fortier 12. Interpreting Discontinuity and Historical Process in Midcontinental Late Archaic and Early Woodland Societies, by Thomas E. Emerson and Dale L. McElrath 13. Hunter-Gatherers and Traditions of Resistance, by Kenneth E. Sassaman 14. Traditions as Cultural Production: Implications for Contemporary Archaeological Research, by Kent G. Lightfoot 15. Concluding Thoughts on Tradition, History, and Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat Timothy R. Pauketat, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana, is the author of The Ascent of Chiefs and coeditor of Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World.
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The Evolution of Calusa

A Nonagricultural Chiefdom of the Southwest Florida Coast

Author: Randolph J. Widmer

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817303588

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 6309

The Evolution of the Calusa attempts to explain how, why, and under what circumstances a complex chiefdom evolved on the southwest Florida coast, apparently without an agricultural subsistence base, and how far back in time it developed.
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Languages of the Pre-Columbian Antilles

Author: Julian Granberry,Gary Vescelius

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 081735123X

Category: History

Page: 153

View: 3938

A linguistic analysis supporting a new model of the colonization of the Antilles before 1492. This work formulates a testable hypothesis of the origins and migration patterns of the aboriginal peoples of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, and Puerto Rico), the Lucayan Islands (the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and the Crown Colony of the Turks and Caicos), the Virgin Islands, and the northernmost of the Leeward Islands, prior to European contact. Using archaeological data as corroboration, the authors synthesize evidence that has been available in scattered locales for more than 500 years but which has never before been correlated and critically examined. Within any well-defined geographical area (such as these islands), the linguistic expectation and norm is that people speaking the same or closely related language will intermarry, and, by participating in a common gene pool, will show similar socioeconomic and cultural traits, as well as common artifact preferences. From an archaeological perspective, the converse is deducible: artifact inventories of a well-defined sociogeographical area are likely to have been created by speakers of the same or closely related language or languages. Languages of the Pre-Columbian Antilles presents information based on these assumptions. The data is scant—scattered words and phrases in Spanish explorers' journals, local place names written on maps or in missionary records—but the collaboration of the authors, one a linguist and the other an archaeologist, has tied the linguistics to the ground wherever possible and allowed the construction of a framework with which to understand the relationships, movements, and settlement patterns of Caribbean peoples before Columbus arrived. "This exhaustive study . . . does a splendid job in pulling together the disparate data of the Taino and other pre-Contact languages of the Caribbean and organizing them into a coherent whole."—Charles Ewen, East Carolina University
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The Archaeology of Citizenship

Author: Stacey Lynn Camp

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813044590

Category: Social Science

Page: 167

View: 8950

An examination from an archaeological perspective of how those in power have tried to mold the citizenship and composition of the United States and the various and often conflicting strategies that have been employed to "Americanize" both immigrant and native non-white populations.
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Myths and Realities of Caribbean History

Author: Basil A. Reid

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817355340

Category: History

Page: 154

View: 3628

This book seeks to debunk eleven popular and prevalent myths about Caribbean history. Using archaeological evidence, it corrects many previous misconceptions promulgated by history books and oral tradition as they specifically relate to the pre-Colonial and European-contact periods. It informs popular audiences, as well as scholars, about the current state of archaeological/historical research in the Caribbean Basin and asserts the value of that research in fostering a better understanding of the region’s past. Contrary to popular belief, the history of the Caribbean did not begin with the arrival of Europeans in 1492. It actually started 7,000 years ago with the infusion of Archaic groups from South America and the successive migrations of other peoples from Central America for about 2,000 years thereafter. In addition to discussing this rich cultural diversity of the Antillean past, Myths and Realities of Caribbean History debates the misuse of terms such as “Arawak” and “Ciboneys,” and the validity of Carib cannibalism allegations.
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Fort Center

An Archaeological Site in the Lake Okeechobee Basin

Author: William Hulse Sears

Publisher: University Press of Florida

ISBN: 9780813012988

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 8755

"An excellent publication on an important southeastern site. . . . This book is a superb archaeological report."--Popular Archaeology "A landmark publication by one of the great American archaeologists, it should be read not only by southeastern specialists but by all concerned with agriculture and ceremonial life in the precolumbian New World."--Michael D. Coe, Curator, Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University Raising intriguing questions about the relationship of South Florida's prehistoric population to the Caribbean basin and about the origins of maize agriculture in the eastern United States, William Sears documents years of fieldwork at Fort Center, a site in the Lake Okeechobee Basin that was named for a nineteenth-century Seminole War fort. The Belle Glade people--by 500 B.C. the first inhabitants of the site--cultivated maize, draining their earliest fields with large circular ditches. Later fields resembled the raised linear earth mounds found at sites in Mesoamerica and northern South America. Excavations uncovered a charnel platform adorned with wood carvings of animals that was preserved in the mucky bottom of a pond, providing an unparalleled collection of prehistoric Indian art. Maps and photographs detailing these finds accompany the text. William H. Sears is professor emeritus in the Department of Anthropology at Florida Atlantic University, where he was Graduate Research Professor for many years.
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The Archaeology of the Caribbean

Author: Samuel M. Wilson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139465295

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 1759

A comprehensive synthesis of Caribbean prehistory from the earliest settlement by humans more than 4000 years BC, to the time of European conquest of the islands. The Caribbean was the last large area in the Americas to be populated, and its relative isolation allowed unique cultures to develop. Samuel Wilson reviews the evidence for migration and cultural change throughout the archipelago, dealing in particular with periods of cultural interaction when groups with different cultures and histories were in contact. He also examines the evolving relationship of the Caribbean people with their environment, as they developed increasingly productive economic systems over time, as well as the emergence of increasingly complex social and political systems, particularly in the Greater Antilles in the centuries before the European conquest. Wilson also provides a review of the history of Caribbean archaeology and the individual scholars and ideas that have shaped the field.
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Florida archaeology

Author: Jerald T. Milanich,Charles Herron Fairbanks

Publisher: Academic Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 8719

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Archaeology of Early Colonial Interaction at El Chorro de Maíta, Cuba

Author: Roberto Valcárcel Rojas

Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist

ISBN: 9780813061566

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 4805

This work enables scholars to examine how the encomienda labor draft worked in the hinterlands, without the everyday presence of Spanish overlords or priests. It allows not only the first opportunity to bring the key research at El Chorro to the attention of the international scholarly community, adding a new dimension to our understanding of the encomienda system, but also to reveal the earliest moments of the hybrid Cuban culture that persists today.
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Archaeology of Northern Florida, A.D. 200-900

The McKeithen Weeden Island Culture

Author: Jerald T. Milanich

Publisher: University Press of Florida

ISBN: 9780813015385

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 5521

"Readable, informative, and simply indispensable to anyone with a serious interest in Eastern North America's prehistory."--American Antiquity "Will be the fundamental reference on the archeology of the north Florida area [and] the Woodland period. . . . Provides a fascinating and informative picture of how modern archaeological studies are performed and how the ideas of researchers can evolve in the face of new data. I highly recommend it."--John F. Scarry, Florida Historical Quarterly More than a millennium ago, the Weeden Island culture flourished across the northern half of Florida and adjacent portions of the Alabama and Georgia coastal plain. For more than a century, archaeologists have marveled over the extraordinary animal effigy pottery vessels left behind by these pre-Columbian peoples in their mounds and villages. In this volume the authors draw on north Florida archaeological excavations and site surveys to unlock the secrets of the Weeden Island culture and its magnificent ceramics. In particular, investigations at the McKeithen site, a multi-mound village site, provide information used to place the culture within the evolutionary framework of native societies in the southeastern United States. New radiocarbon dates from that site establish a firm chronological framework for Weeden Island developments. The authors examine the role of mound-building vis-à-vis social and village organization and provide definitive assessments about the crafting of Weeden Island ceramics and the ritual and social significance of animal effigy figurines and other pottery. From a wealth of past and present field investigations and from modern laboratory analyses, conclusions are offered about Weeden Island lifeways, social structure, and sociopolitical stability. Archaeology of Northern Florida provides a much-needed and valuable synthesis of the Weeden Island culture, one that fundamentally alters how we view the pre-Columbian Southeast. It will be of interest to professional archaeologists, students, and that large segment of the general public that enjoys learning about the past around us. The authors, with more than a half-century of professional experience among them, have carried out archaeological investigations across the United States. Jerald T. Milanich is author of Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida (UPF, 1994) and Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe (UPF, 1995).
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The Archaeology of Pineland

A Coastal Southwest Florida Site Complex, A.d. 50-1710

Author: William H. Marquardt,Karen J. Walker

Publisher: Iaps Books

ISBN: 9781881448136

Category: History

Page: 935

View: 8631

By the 1500s the Calusa Indians controlled all of southern Florida. Their archaeological sites dot the southwestern Florida Gulf coast, yet little has been known about them until recently. This book focuses on the site complex at Pineland, location of the second largest of the Calusa towns. It encompassed more than 100 acres, and was the beginning point of the remarkable Pine Island Canal. The research at Pineland is the first extensive study of any principal Calusa town and of the bountiful but dynamic environment that sustained these remarkable Native Floridians. The Archaeology of Pineland reports the results of a multi-year, interdisciplinary project. Focused mainly on 1700 years of Native American occupation, the book also provides new information about post-contact changes in culture and landscape. Abundantly illustrated, the book's 19 chapters include more than 400 figures. The book contains never-before-published information about the archaeology, history, and environment of Southwest Florida, and will be an essential reference work for future studies. It also stands as a detailed and tangible case study in historical ecology.
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Precolumbian Architecture in Eastern North America

Author: William N. Morgan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813016597

Category: Architecture

Page: 272

View: 7212

"An invaluable, splendidly illustrated overview of the grand construction projects of the precolumbian inhabitants of eastern North America."--Eduard F. Sekler, professor emeritus of architecture, Harvard University William Morgan, one of the nation's renowned architects, analyzes prehistoric architecture beginning more than 6,000 years ago and continuing through two periods of stunning creativity before Columbus's arrival in the New World. Magnificently illustrated with scaled drawings and aerial and eye-level photographs, it is the most comprehensive overview to date of ancient eastern North American monuments. Morgan organizes the book in three periods: the beginnings of architecture dating from 4000 B.C., at such sites as Watson Brake and Poverty Point in Louisiana; the first extraordinary era of architectural achievement near the beginning of the Christian era, at the ceremonial centers of the Ohio Valley; and the period just preceding Columbus's arrival, at the remarkable temple towns of the Mississippi Valley. In a clearly and concisely written account, Morgan describes architectural characteristics of 96 precolumbian sites and offers razor-sharp graphics and supplementary information about each. In addition, 12 well-known sites--such as Stonehenge, the Acropolis, and Angkor Wat--are presented at the book's graphic scale to assist readers in comprehending the size and character of the ancient North American monuments. Not only architects but archaeologists, anthropologists, geographers, artists, and anyone interested in the remote past will discover in this book prehistoric earthworks that are dramatically rich in both form and meaning. William N. Morgan, FAIA, a practicing architect in Jacksonville, Florida, is the author of Ancient Architecture of the Southwest and Prehistoric Architecture in Micronesia. A frequent visiting lecturer in architecture at universities throughout the United States, he recently was appointed the Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Chair in Architectural Preservation at the University of Florida. During his career he has received numerous honors and design awards, including the AIA's 1998 Institute Honor for research and recording of ancient American civilizations.
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Investigating the Ordinary

Everyday Matters in Southeast Archaeology

Author: Sarah E. Price,Philip J. Carr

Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist

ISBN: 9781683400219

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 1981

Centering the archaeological discussion on the everyday affords a vantage point from which to think about the artifacts and conceptions of the past in new ways. Although not written specifically for the non-archaeological audience, this volume serves as an engaging entry into archaeological thinking through exploration of various times and topics.
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