Archaeology in South Carolina

Exploring the Hidden Heritage of the Palmetto State

Author: Adam King

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611176093

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 7378

Adam King’s Archaeology in South Carolina contains an overview of the fascinating archaeological research currently ongoing in the Palmetto state featuring essays by twenty scholars studying South Carolina’s past through archaeological research. The scholarly contributions are enhanced by more than one hundred black and white and thirty-eight color images of some of the most important and interesting sites and artifacts found in the state. South Carolina has an extraordinarily rich history encompassing the first human habitation of North America to the lives of people at the dawn of the modern era. King begins the anthology with the basic hows and whys of archeology and introduces readers to the current issues influencing the field of research. The contributors are all recognized experts from universities, state agencies, and private consulting firms, reflecting the diversity of people and institutions that engage in archaeology. The volume begins with investigations of some of the earliest Paleo-Indian and Native American cultures that thrived in South Carolina, including work at the Topper Site along the Savannah River. Other essays explore the creation of early communities at the Stallings Island site, the emergence of large and complex Native American polities before the coming of Europeans,the impact of the coming of European settlers on Native American groups along the Savannah River, and the archaeology of the Yamassee, apeople whose history is tightly bound to the emerging European society. The focus then shifts to Euro-Americans with an examination of a long-term project seeking to understand George Galphin’s trading post established on the Savannah River in the eighteenth century. A discussion of Middleburg Plantation, one of the oldest plantation houses in the South Carolina lowcountry, is followed by a fascinating glimpse into how the city of Charleston and the lives of its inhabitants changed during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Essays on underwater archaeological research cover several Civil War-era vessels located in Winyah Bay near Georgetown and Station Creek near Beaufort, as well as one of the most famous Civil War naval vessels—the H.L. Hunley. The volume concludes with the recollections of a life spent in the field by South Carolina’s preeminent historical archaeologist Stanley South, now retired from the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of South Carolina.
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The Yamasee Indians

From Florida to South Carolina

Author: Denise I. Bossy

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 1496212274

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 5310

The Yamasee Indians are best known for their involvement in the Indian slave trade and the eighteenth-century war (1715-54) that took their name. Yet, their significance in colonial history is far larger than that. Denise I. Bossy brings together archaeologists of South Carolina and Florida with historians of the Native South, Spanish Florida, and British Carolina for the first time to answer elusive questions about the Yamasees' identity, history, and fate. Until now scholarly works have rarely focused on the Yamasees themselves. In southern history, the Yamasees appear only sporadically outside of slave raiding or the Yamasee War. Their culture and political structures, the complexities of their many migrations, their kinship networks, and their survival remain largely uninvestigated. The Yamasees' relative obscurity in scholarship is partly a result of their geographic mobility. Reconstructing their past has posed a real challenge in light of their many, often overlapping, migrations. In addition, the campaigns waged by the British (and the Americans after them) in order to erase the Yamasees from the South forced Yamasee survivors to camouflage bit by bit their identities. The Yamasee Indians recovers the complex history of these peoples. In this critically important new volume, historians and archaeologists weave together the fractured narratives of the Yamasees through probing questions about their mobility, identity, and networks.
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Investigating the Ordinary

Everyday Matters in Southeast Archaeology

Author: Sarah E. Price,Philip J. Carr

Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist

ISBN: 9781683400219

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 6357

Centering the archaeological discussion on the everyday affords a vantage point from which to think about the artifacts and conceptions of the past in new ways. Although not written specifically for the non-archaeological audience, this volume serves as an engaging entry into archaeological thinking through exploration of various times and topics.
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The Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes

Author: Max E. White

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813025766

Category: History

Page: 149

View: 992

The story of Georgia’s Indians from elephant hunts to the European invasion. Spanning 12,000 years, this scientifically accurate and very readable book guides readers through the prehistoric and historic archaeological evidence left by Georgia’s native peoples. It is the only comprehensive, up-to-date, and text-based overview of its kind in print. Drawing on an extensive body of archaeological and historical data, White traces Native American cultural development and accomplishment over the millennia preceding the establishment of Georgia as a colony and state. Each chapter opens with a vivid fictional vignette transporting the reader to a past culture and setting the scene for the narrative that follows. From hunting giant buffalo and elephants to attempts in the 1700s and 1800s to maintain tribal integrity in the face of European and Euro-American violence and threats, White takes the reader on an archaeologically based tour of the land that today is Georgia. Evidence from selected archaeological sites and projects is woven into the narrative, and insets supplement the main text to highlight informative passages from archaeological reports and historical documents. A generous number of photographs, maps, and illustrations aid the reader in identifying artifacts and testify to the artistic abilities of these indigenous peoples of Georgia.
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The Savannah River Chiefdoms

Political Change in the Late Prehistoric Southeast

Author: David G. Anderson

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817307257

Category: History

Page: 459

View: 3131

This volume explores political change in chiefdoms, specifically how complex chiefdoms emerge and collapse, and how this process—called cycling—can be examined using archaeological, ethnohistoric, paleoclimatic, paleosubsistence, and physical anthropological data. The focus for the research is the prehistoric and initial contact-era Mississippian chiefdoms of the Southeastern United States, specifically the societies occupying the Savannah River basin from ca. A.D. 1000 to 1600. This regional focus and the multidisciplinary nature of the investigation provide a solid introduction to the Southeastern Mississippian archaeological record and the study of cultural evolution in general.
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Etowah

The Political History of a Chiefdom Capital

Author: Adam King

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817312242

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 5942

A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication This is a detailed reconstruction of the waxing and waning of political fortunes among the chiefly elites at an important center of the prehistoric world. At the time the first Europeans arrived in the New World, thousands of earthen platform mounds dotted the landscape of eastern North America. Only a few of the mound sites have survived the ravages of time and the devastation of pilferers; one of these valuable monuments is Etowah, located near Cartersville in northern Georgia. Over a period of more than 100 years, excavations of the site’s six mounds, and in particular Mound C, have yielded a wealth of artifacts, including marble statues, copper embossed plates, ceremonial items, and personal adornments. These objects indicate an extensive trading network between Mississippian centers and confirm contact with Spanish conquistadores near Etowah in the mid-1500s. Adam King has analyzed the architecture and artifacts of Etowah and deduced its vital role in the prehistory of the area. He advances a plausible historical sequence and a model for the ancient town's complex political structure. The chiefdom society relied upon institutional social ranking, permanent political offices, religious ideology, a redistribution of goods and services, and the willing support of the constituent population. King reveals strategies used by the paramount chiefs to maintain their sources of power and to control changes in the social organization. Elite alliances did not necessarily involve the extreme asymmetry of political domination and tribute extraction. King's use of ceramic assemblages recovered from Etowah to determine the occupation history and the construction sequence of public facilities (mounds and plazas) at the center is significant. This fresh interpretation of the Etowah site places it in a contemporary social and political context with other Mississippian cultures. It is a one-volume sourcebook for the Etowah polity and its neighbors and will, therefore, command an eager audience of scholars and generalists.
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Early Pottery in the Southeast

Tradition and Innovation in Cooking Technology

Author: Kenneth E. Sassaman

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 081738426X

Category: Art

Page: 304

View: 1262

A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication Among southeastern Indians pottery was an innovation that enhanced the economic value of native foods and the efficiency of food preparation. But even though pottery was available in the Southeast as early as 4,500 years ago, it took nearly two millenia before it was widely used. Why would an innovation of such economic value take so long to be adopted? The answer lies in the social and political contexts of traditional cooking technology. Sassaman's book questions the value of using technological traits alone to mark temporal and spatial boundaries of prehistoric cultures and shows how social process shapes the prehistoric archaeological record.
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The Formative Cultures of the Carolina Piedmont

Author: Joffre Lanning Coe

Publisher: Office of Archives and History North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

ISBN: 9780865263239

Category: History

Page: 130

View: 8293

The name Joffre Lanning Coe (1916-2000) is synonymous with North Carolina archaeology, and the original publication of this book in 1964 represented a landmark in American archaeology. In it Coe reported the results of investigations at three North Carolina archaeological sites and revolutionized perspectives about the age and depth of archaeological sites in the Eastern Woodlands. This work is the original source for many projectile point types identified with the Archaic period (8,000 - 1,000 B.C.) and is frequently cited as such by archaeologists, scholars, and collectors.
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Ramblings of a Lowcountry Game Warden

A Memoir

Author: Ben McC. Moïse

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 9781570037283

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 233

View: 2863

Moise served with distinction as a South Carolina game warden for nearly a quarter century, patrolling the coastal woods and waters of the Palmetto State. This memoir chronicles grueling stakeouts, complex trials, hair-raising adventures, and daily interactions with a host of outrageous personalities.
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The Best Gun in the World

George Woodward Morse and the South Carolina State Military Works

Author: Robert S. Seigler

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611177936

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 4907

A year after seceding from the Union, South Carolina and the Confederate States government faced the daunting challenge of equipping soldiers with weapons, ammunition, and other military implements during the American Civil War. In The Best Gun in the World, Robert S. Seigler explains how South Carolina created its own armory and then enlisted the help of a weapons technology inventor to meet the demand. Seigler mined state and federal factory records, national and state archives, and U.S. patents for detailed information on weapons production, the salaries and status of free and enslaved employees, and other financial records to reveal an interesting, distinctive story of technological innovation and industrialization in South Carolina. George Woodward Morse, originally from New Hampshire, was a machinist and firearms innovator, who settled in Louisiana in the 1840s. He invented a reliable breechloading firearm in the mid-1850s to replace muzzleloaders that were ubiquitous throughout the world. Essential to the successful operation of any breechloader was its ammunition, and Morse perfected the first metallic, center-fire, pre-primed cartridge, his most notable contribution to the development of modern firearms. The U.S. War Department tested Morse rifles and cartridges prior to the beginning of the Civil War and contracted with the inventor to produce the weapons at Harpers Ferry Armory. However, when the war began, Morse, a slave-holding plantation owner, determined that he could sell more of his guns in the South. The South Carolina State Military Works originally designed to cast cannon, produced Morse’s carbine and modified muskets, brass cartridges, cartridge boxes, and other military accoutrements. The armory ultimately produced only about 1,350 Morse firearms. For the next twenty years, Morse sought to regain his legacy as the inventor of the center-fire brass cartridges that are today standard ammunition for military and sporting firearms.
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Atlanta's Ponce de Leon Avenue

A History

Author: Sharon Foster Jones

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 161423468X

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 4161

Named for the famous Spanish explorer who was said to have discovered the Fountain of Youth, Atlanta’s Ponce de Leon Avenue began as a simple country road that conveyed visitors to the healing springs that once bubbled along it. Now, few motorists realize that the avenue, one of Atlanta’s major commuter thoroughfares, was a prestigious residential street in Victorian Atlanta, home to mayors and millionaires. An economic turn in the twentieth century transformed the avenue into a crime-ridden commercial corridor, but in recent years, Atlantans have rediscovered the street’s venerable architecture and storied history. Join local historian Sharon Foster Jones on a vivid tour of the avenue—from picnics by the springs in hoopskirts and Atlanta Crackers baseball to the Fox Theatre and the days when Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable and Al Capone lodged in the esteemed hotels lining this magnificent avenue.
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Southeastern Ceremonial Complex

Chronology, Content, Contest

Author: Adam King

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817354093

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 4609

A timely, comprehensive reevaluation of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex. One of the most venerable concepts in Southeastern archaeology is that of the Southern Cult. The idea has its roots in the intensely productive decade (archaeologically) of the 1930s and is fundamentally tied to yet another venerable concept—Mississippian culture. The last comprehensive study of the melding of these two concepts into the term Southeastern Ceremonial Complex (SECC) is more than two decades old, yet our understanding of the objects, themes, and artistic styles associated with the SECC have changed a great deal. New primary data have come to light that bear directly on the complex, requiring a thorough reanalysis of both concepts and dating. Recent publications have ignited many debates about the dating and the nature of the SECC. This work presents new data and new ideas on the temporal and social contexts, artistic styles, and symbolic themes included in the complex. It also demonstrates that engraved shell gorgets, along with other SECC materials, were produced before A.D. 1400.
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Wild South Carolina

A Field Guide to Parks, Preserves and Special Places

Author: Liesel Hamilton,Susan Hamilton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781938235252

Category: Nature

Page: N.A

View: 3767

From mountainous rainforests to isolated barrier islands, the Palmetto State is a remarkable place to experience plant and animal life. Organized by region and illustrated with more than 150 color photographs, Wild South Carolina presents handpicked tours of 37 special parks, wildlife refuges, heritage preserves, and other public lands. Hike, bike or ride a horse.
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Discovering South Carolina's Rock Art

Author: Tommy Charles

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611172128

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 7741

For years Tommy Charles scoured South Carolina's upcountry for examples of ancient rock art carvings and paintings, efforts conducted on behalf of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA). As SCIAA's collections coordinator, Charles amassed considerable field experience in both prehistoric and historic archaeology and had firsthand involvement in cataloging sixty-four sites of South Carolina rock art. Charles chronicles his adventures in exploration and preservation in Discovering South Carolina's Rock Art. Although Native American rock art is common in the western United States and even at many sites east of the Mississippi, it was believed to be almost nonexistent in South Carolina until the 1980s, when several randomly discovered petroglyphs were reported in the upstate. These discoveries set in motion the first organized endeavor to identify and document these ancient examples of human expression in South Carolina. Over the ensuing years, and assisted by a host of volunteers and avocational collectors, Charles scoured the Piedmont and mountains of South Carolina in search of additional rock art. Frustrated by the inability to find these elusive artifacts, many of which are eroded almost beyond visibility, Charles began employing methods still considered unorthodox by current scientific standards for archaeological research to assist with his search and documentation. Survey efforts led to the discovery of rock art created by Native Americans and Europeans. Of particular interest are the many circle-and-line petroglyphs the survey found in South Carolina. Seeking a reason for this repetitive symbol, Charles's investigation into these finds led to the discovery that similar motifs had been identified along the Appalachian Mountains from Alabama to New York, as well as in the American Southwest and Western Europe. This engrossing account of the search for South Carolina's rock art brings awareness to the precarious state of these artifacts, threatened not only by natural attrition but also by human activities. Charles argues that, if left unprotected, rock art is ultimately doomed to exist only in our historical records.
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Contemporary Lithic Analysis in the Southeast

Problems, Solutions, and Interpretations

Author: Philip J. Carr,Andrew P. Bradbury,Sarah E. Price

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817356991

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 8257

Normal0falsefalsefalseEN-USX-NONEX-NONEMicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Representing work by a mixture of veterans and a new generation of lithic analysts, Contemporary Lithic Analysis in the Southeast explores fresh ideas while reworking and pushing the limits of traditional methods and hypotheses. The variability in the southeastern lithic landscape over space and through time makes it a dynamic and challenging region for archaeologists. Demonstrating a holistic approach and using a variety of methods, this volume aims to derive information regarding prehistoric lifeways from lithic assemblages. The contributors use data from a wide temporal span and a variety of sites across the Southeast, ranging from Texas to South Carolina and from Florida to Kentucky. Not merely cautionary tales, these case studies demonstrate the necessity of looking beyond the bag of lithic material sitting in the laboratory to address the key questions in the organization of prehistoric lithic technologies. How do field-collection strategies bias our interpretations? What is therelationship between technological strategies and tool design? How can inferences regarding social and economic strategies be made from lithic assemblages? Contributors William Andrefsky Jr. / Andrew P. Bradbury / Philip J. Carr / CarolynConklin / D. Randall Cooper / Jason L.Edmonds / Jay D. Franklin / Albert C.Goodyear III / Joel Hardison / Lucinda M.Langston / D. Shane Miller / George H.Odell / Charlotte D. Pevny / Tara L. Potts /Sarah E. Price / Douglas Sain / Sarah C.Sherwood / Ashley M. Smallwood /Paul Thacker
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Another's Country

Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on Cultural Interactions in the Southern Colonies

Author: J.W. Joseph

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817311297

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 8604

Leading historical archaeologists offer an engaging look at the rise and fall of cultural diversity in the colonial South and its role in shaping a distinct southern identity.
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My Exaggerated Life

Pat Conroy

Author: Katherine Clark

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611179084

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 8011

Pat Conroy’s memoirs and autobiographical novels contain a great deal about his life, but there is much he hasn’t revealed to readers—until now. My Exaggerated Life is the product of a special collaboration between this great American author and oral biographer Katherine Clark, who recorded two hundred hours of conversations with Conroy before he passed away in 2016. In the spring and summer of 2014, the two spoke for an hour or more on the phone every day. No subject was off limits, including aspects of his tumultuous life he had never before revealed. This oral biography presents Conroy the man, as if speaking in person, in the colloquial voice familiar to family and friends. This voice is quite different from the authorial style found in his books, which are famous for their lyricism and poetic descriptions. Here Conroy is blunt, plainspoken, and uncommonly candid. While his novels are known for their tragic elements, this volume is suffused with Conroy’s sense of humor, which he credits with saving his life on several occasions. The story Conroy offers here is about surviving and overcoming the childhood abuse and trauma that marked his life. He is frank about his emotional damage—the depression, the alcoholism, the divorces, and, above all, the crippling lack of self-esteem and self-confidence. He also sheds light on the forces that saved his life from ruin. The act of writing compelled Conroy to confront the painful truths about his past, while years of therapy with a clinical psychologist helped him achieve a greater sense of self-awareness and understanding. As Conroy recounts his time in Atlanta, Rome, and San Francisco, along with his many years in Beaufort, South Carolina, he portrays a journey full of struggles and suffering that culminated ultimately in redemption and triumph. Although he gained worldwide recognition for his writing, Conroy believed his greatest achievement was in successfully carving out a life filled with family and friends, as well as love and happiness. In the end he arrived at himself and found it was a good place to be.
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Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida

Author: Jerald T. Milanich

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813012728

Category: Social Science

Page: 476

View: 8141

In a richly illustrated book that will appeal to professional and avocational archaeologists, scholars, tourists, and local history buffs, Milanich introduces the material heritage of the first Floridians through the interpretation of artifacts and archaeological sites.
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The Other Side of Charleston

Archaeological Survey of the Saks Fifth Avenue Location, Charleston, South Carolina

Author: Michael Trinkley,Debi Hacker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Charleston (S.C.)

Page: 181

View: 920

A study of the 1994 archaeological and historical survey of the block in Charleston, S.C.--bounded by King St., Princess St., Archdale St., and Market St.--proposed for the construction of the Saks Fifth Avenue department store. Five site areas are explored, one associated with a standing structure used as a saloon and grocery throughout its history (corner of Market and Archdale), two associated with free persons of color, one associated with a middle-income white family, and a fifth associated with the rear alleyway of a businessman's hotel during the 19th century.
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