Arc of Justice

A Saga of Race, Civil Rights, and Murder in the Jazz Age

Author: Kevin Boyle

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429900164

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 1806

An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Ossian Sweet, a proud Negro doctor-grandson of a slave-had made the long climb from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood. Yet just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. And so it began-a chain of events that brought America's greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of equality. Historian Kevin Boyle weaves the police investigation and courtroom drama of Sweet's murder trial into an unforgettable tapestry of narrative history that documents the volatile America of the 1920s and movingly re-creates the Sweet family's journey from slavery through the Great Migration to the middle class. Ossian Sweet's story, so richly and poignantly captured here, is an epic tale of one man trapped by the battles of his era's changing times. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.
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Goodbye Chinatown

Roman

Author: Jean Kwok

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783442472345

Category:

Page: 350

View: 352

Tagsüber fasziniert sie ihre Lehrer mit ihrem brillanten Verstand. Nachts näht sie für einen Hungerlohn Röcke in Chinatown. Die junge Kimberly Chang lebt in zwei Welten. Doch nur eine Welt kann ihr eine Zukunft bieten... Die elfjährige Kimberly Chang verlässt mit ihrer Mutter Hongkong, um in New York bei einer Verwandten ein neues Leben zu beginnen. Doch dort angekommen, lässt Tante Paula die beiden für einen Hungerlohn in ihrer Kleiderfabrik arbeiten. Kimberly aber ist ein hochbegabtes Kind mit einem brillanten mathematischen Verstand. Ihre Lehrer merken bald, dass sie zu Höherem bestimmt ist. Doch Kimberly kann ihren Weg nur gehen, wenn es ihr gelingt, auch ihre sanftmütige Mutter aus dem Elend Chinatowns herauszuholen.
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The UAW and the Heyday of American Liberalism, 1945–1968

Author: Kevin Boyle

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501713272

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 1065

"Kevin Boyle has done a masterful job of identifying the unique contribution of the UAW, not only to American Liberalism, but also to the nation and to all people. As contemporary labor and society at large search for new directions, this book should be required reading."—Victor G. Reuther
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Warten auf Schnee in Havanna

Bekenntnisse eines kubanischen Jungen

Author: Carlos M. N. Eire

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783453400962

Category:

Page: 188

View: 8662

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Commonsense Anticommunism

Labor and Civil Liberties between the World Wars

Author: Jennifer Luff

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807869899

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 9053

Between the Great War and Pearl Harbor, conservative labor leaders declared themselves America's "first line of defense" against Communism. In this surprising account, Jennifer Luff shows how the American Federation of Labor fanned popular anticommunism but defended Communists' civil liberties in the aftermath of the 1919 Red Scare. The AFL's "commonsense anticommunism," she argues, steered a middle course between the American Legion and the ACLU, helping to check campaigns for federal sedition laws. But in the 1930s, frustration with the New Deal order led labor conservatives to redbait the Roosevelt administration and liberal unionists and abandon their reluctant civil libertarianism for red scare politics. That frustration contributed to the legal architecture of federal anticommunism that culminated with the McCarthyist fervor of the 1950s. Relying on untapped archival sources, Luff reveals how labor conservatives and the emerging civil liberties movement debated the proper role of the state in policing radicals and grappled with the challenges to the existing political order posed by Communist organizers. Surprising conclusions about familiar figures, like J. Edgar Hoover, and unfamiliar episodes, like a German plot to disrupt American munitions manufacture, make Luff's story a fresh retelling of the interwar years.
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Racism in the Nation's Service

Government Workers and the Color Line in Woodrow Wilson's America

Author: Eric S. Yellin

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607212

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 1474

Between the 1880s and 1910s, thousands of African Americans passed civil service exams and became employed in the executive offices of the federal government. However, by 1920, promotions to well-paying federal jobs had nearly vanished for black workers. Eric S. Yellin argues that the Wilson administration's successful 1913 drive to segregate the federal government was a pivotal episode in the age of progressive politics. Yellin investigates how the enactment of this policy, based on Progressives' demands for whiteness in government, imposed a color line on American opportunity and implicated Washington in the economic limitation of African Americans for decades to come. Using vivid accounts of the struggles and protests of African American government employees, Yellin reveals the racism at the heart of the era's reform politics. He illuminates the nineteenth-century world of black professional labor and social mobility in Washington, D.C., and uncovers the Wilson administration's progressive justifications for unraveling that world. From the hopeful days following emancipation to the white-supremacist "normalcy" of the 1920s, Yellin traces the competing political ideas, politicians, and ordinary government workers who created "federal segregation."
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Race, Law, and American Society

1607-Present

Author: Gloria J. Browne-Marshall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135087938

Category: Law

Page: 480

View: 9716

This second edition of Gloria Browne-Marshall’s seminal work , tracing the history of racial discrimination in American law from colonial times to the present, is now available with major revisions. Throughout, she advocates for freedom and equality at the center, moving from their struggle for physical freedom in the slavery era to more recent battles for equal rights and economic equality. From the colonial period to the present, this book examines education, property ownership, voting rights, criminal justice, and the military as well as internationalism and civil liberties by analyzing the key court cases that established America’s racial system and demonstrating the impact of these court cases on American society. This edition also includes more on Asians, Native Americans, and Latinos. Race, Law, and American Society is highly accessible and thorough in its depiction of the role race has played, with the sanction of the U.S. Supreme Court, in shaping virtually every major American social institution.
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Wounds of Returning

Race, Memory, and Property on the Postslavery Plantation

Author: Jessica Adams

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606534

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 1037

From Storyville brothels and narratives of turn-of-the-century New Orleans to plantation tours, Bette Davis films, Elvis memorials, Willa Cather's fiction, and the annual prison rodeo held at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, Jessica Adams considers spatial and ideological evolutions of southern plantations after slavery. In Wounds of Returning, Adams shows that the slave past returns to inhabit plantation landscapes that have been radically transformed by tourism, consumer culture, and modern modes of punishment--even those landscapes from which slavery has supposedly been banished completely. Adams explores how the commodification of black bodies during slavery did not disappear with abolition--rather, the same principle was transformed into modern consumer capitalism. As Adams demonstrates, however, counternarratives and unexpected cultural hybrids erupt out of attempts to re-create the plantation as an uncomplicated scene of racial relationships or a signifier of national unity. Peeling back the layers of plantation landscapes, Adams reveals connections between seemingly disparate features of modern culture, suggesting that they remain haunted by the force of the unnatural equation of people as property.
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Art for Equality

The NAACP's Cultural Campaign for Civil Rights

Author: Jenny Woodley

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813145171

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 7231

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the nation's oldest civil rights organization, having dedicated itself to the fight for racial equality since 1909. While the group helped achieve substantial victories in the courtroom, the struggle for civil rights extended beyond gaining political support. It also required changing social attitudes. The NAACP thus worked to alter existing prejudices through the production of art that countered racist depictions of African Americans, focusing its efforts not only on changing the attitudes of the white middle class but also on encouraging racial pride and a sense of identity in the black community. Art for Equality explores an important and little-studied side of the NAACP's activism in the cultural realm. In openly supporting African American artists, writers, and musicians in their creative endeavors, the organization aimed to change the way the public viewed the black community. By overcoming stereotypes and the belief of the majority that African Americans were physically, intellectually, and morally inferior to whites, the NAACP believed it could begin to defeat racism. Illuminating important protests, from the fight against the 1915 film The Birth of a Nation to the production of anti-lynching art during the Harlem Renaissance, this insightful volume examines the successes and failures of the NAACP's cultural campaign from 1910 to the 1960s. Exploring the roles of gender and class in shaping the association's patronage of the arts, Art for Equality offers an in-depth analysis of the social and cultural climate during a time of radical change in America.
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To Promote the General Welfare

The Case for Big Government

Author: Steven Conn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986746

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 4072

Americans love to hate their government, and a long tradition of anti-government suspicion reaches back to debates among the founders of the nation. But the election of Barack Obama has created a backlash rivaled only by the anti-government hysteria that preceded the Civil War. Lost in all the Tea Party rage and rhetoric is this simple fact: the federal government plays a central role in making our society function, and it always has. Edited by Steven Conn and written by some of America's leading scholars, the essays in To Promote the General Welfare explore the many ways government programs have improved the quality of life in America. The essays cover everything from education, communication, and transportation to arts and culture, housing, finance, and public health. They explore how and why government programs originated, how they have worked and changed--and been challenged--since their inception, and why many of them are important to preserve. The book shows how the WPA provided vital, in some cases career-saving, assistance to artists and writers like Jackson Pollock, Dorothea Lange, Richard Wright, John Cheever, and scores of others; how millions of students from diverse backgrounds have benefited and continue to benefit from the G.I. Bill, Fulbright scholarships, and federally insured student loans; and how the federal government created an Interstate highway system unparalleled in the world, linking the entire nation. These are just a few examples of highly successful programs the book celebrates--and that anti-government critics typically ignore. For anyone wishing to explore the flip side of today's vehement attacks on American government, To Promote the General Welfare is the best place to start.
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Lift Every Voice

The Naacp and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Patricia Sullivan

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 1595585117

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9611

A “civil rights Hall of Fame” (Kirkus) that was published to remarkable praise in conjunction with the NAACP’s Centennial Celebration, Lift Every Voice is a momentous history of the struggle for civil rights told through the stories of men and women who fought inescapable racial barriers in the North as well as the South—keeping the promise of democracy alive from the earliest days of the twentieth century to the triumphs of the 1950s and 1960s. Historian Patricia Sullivan unearths the little-known early decades of the NAACP’s activism, telling startling stories of personal bravery, legal brilliance, and political maneuvering by the likes of W.E.B. Du Bois, Mary White Ovington, Walter White, Charles Houston, Ella Baker, Thurgood Marshall, and Roy Wilkins. In the critical post-war era, following a string of legal victories culminating in Brown v. Board, the NAACP knocked out the legal underpinnings of the segregation system and set the stage for the final assault on Jim Crow. A sweeping and dramatic story woven deep into the fabric of American history—”history that helped shape America’s consciousness, if not its soul” (Booklist) — Lift Every Voice offers a timeless lesson on how people, without access to the traditional levers of power, can create change under seemingly impossible odds.
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Old Islam in Detroit

Rediscovering the Muslim American Past

Author: Sally Howell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199372020

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7453

Across North America, Islam is portrayed as a religion of immigrants, converts, and cultural outsiders. Yet Muslims have been part of American society for much longer than most people realize. This book documents the history of Islam in Detroit, a city that is home to several of the nation's oldest, most diverse Muslim communities. In the early 1900s, there were thousands of Muslims in Detroit. Most came from Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire, and British India. In 1921, they built the nation's first mosque in Highland Park. By the 1930s, new Islam-oriented social movements were taking root among African Americans in Detroit. By the 1950s, Albanians, Arabs, African Americans, and South Asians all had mosques and religious associations in the city, and they were confident that Islam could be, and had already become, an American religion. When immigration laws were liberalized in 1965, new immigrants and new African American converts rapidly became the majority of U.S. Muslims. For them, Detroit's old Muslims and their mosques seemed oddly Americanized, even unorthodox. Old Islam in Detroit explores the rise of Detroit's earliest Muslim communities. It documents the culture wars and doctrinal debates that ensued as these populations confronted Muslim newcomers who did not understand their manner of worship or the American identities they had created. Looking closely at this historical encounter, Old Islam in Detroit provides a new interpretation of the possibilities and limits of Muslim incorporation in American life. It shows how Islam has become American in the past and how the anxieties many new Muslim Americans and non-Muslims feel about the place of Islam in American society today are not inevitable, but are part of a dynamic process of political and religious change that is still unfolding.
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The Judicial Branch

Author: Kermit L. Hall,Kevin T. McGuire

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195309171

Category: Political Science

Page: 579

View: 1884

Presents a collection of essays examining the American judiciary, including such topics as judicial review and interpretation, judicial activism, the judiciary and the political process, and selecting Supreme Court justices.
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A Companion to Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover

Author: Katherine A.S. Sibley

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 111883447X

Category: History

Page: 616

View: 9818

With the analysis of the best scholars on this era, 29 essaysdemonstrate how academics then and now have addressed thepolitical, economic, diplomatic, cultural, ethnic, and socialhistory of the presidents of the Republican Era of 1921-1933 -Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover. This is the first historiographical treatment of along-neglected period, ranging from early treatments to the mostrecent scholarship Features review essays on the era, including the legacy ofprogressivism in an age of “normalcy”, the history ofAmerican foreign relations after World War I, and race relations inthe 1920s, as well as coverage of the three presidential electionsand a thorough treatment of the causes and consequences of theGreat Depression An introduction by the editor provides an overview of theissues, background and historical problems of the time, and thepersonalities at play
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Dissent

The History of an American Idea

Author: Ralph Young

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479814520

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 1160

Finalist, 2016 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award One of Bustle's Books For Your Civil Disobedience Reading List Dissent: The History of an American Idea examines the key role dissent has played in shaping the United States. It focuses on those who, from colonial days to the present, dissented against the ruling paradigm of their time: from the Puritan Anne Hutchinson and Native American chief Powhatan in the seventeenth century, to the Occupy and Tea Party movements in the twenty-first century. The emphasis is on the way Americans, celebrated figures and anonymous ordinary citizens, responded to what they saw as the injustices that prevented them from fully experiencing their vision of America. At its founding the United States committed itself to lofty ideals. When the promise of those ideals was not fully realized by all Americans, many protested and demanded that the United States live up to its promise. Women fought for equal rights; abolitionists sought to destroy slavery; workers organized unions; Indians resisted white encroachment on their land; radicals angrily demanded an end to the dominance of the moneyed interests; civil rights protestors marched to end segregation; antiwar activists took to the streets to protest the nation’s wars; and reactionaries, conservatives, and traditionalists in each decade struggled to turn back the clock to a simpler, more secure time. Some dissenters are celebrated heroes of American history, while others are ordinary people: frequently overlooked, but whose stories show that change is often accomplished through grassroots activism. The United States is a nation founded on the promise and power of dissent. In this stunningly comprehensive volume, Ralph Young shows us its history. Teaching Resources from Temple University: Sample Course Syllabus Teaching Resources from C-Span Classroom Teaching Resources from Temple University
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Detroit:

The Black Bottom Community

Author: Jeremy Williams

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439624356

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 7857

Between 1914 and 1951, Black Bottom's black community emerged out of the need for black migrants to find a place for themselves. Because of the stringent racism and discrimination in housing, blacks migrating from the South seeking employment in Detroit's burgeoning industrial metropolis were forced to live in this former European immigrant community. During World War I through World War II, Black Bottom became a social, cultural, and economic center of struggle and triumph, as well as a testament to the tradition of black self-help and community-building strategies that have been the benchmark of black struggle. Black Bottom also had its troubles and woes. However, it would be these types of challenges confronting Black Bottom residents that would become part of the cohesive element that turned Black Bottom into a strong and viable community.
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Die letzten Tage der Nacht

Author: Graham Moore

Publisher: BASTEI LÜBBE

ISBN: 3732539822

Category: Fiction

Page: 463

View: 5990

"Eine geniale Reise in die Vergangenheit" The Washington Post New York, 1888. Thomas Edison hat mit seiner bahnbrechenden Erfindung der Glühbirne ein Wunder gewirkt. Die Elektrizität ist geboren, die dunklen Tage der Menschheit sind Vergangenheit. Nur eine Sache steht Edison und seinem Monopol im Weg, sein Konkurrent George Westinghouse. Zwischen den beiden Männern entbrennt ein juristischer Kampf, es geht um die Milliarden-Dollar-Frage: Wer hat die Glühbirne wirklich erfunden? Und wer hat also die Macht, ein ganzes Land zu elektrifizieren? Der NEW YORK TIMES-Bestseller jetzt auf deutsch! Graham Moore, der für sein Drehbuch für den Film "Imitation Game" mit einem Oscar ausgezeichnet wurde, ist mit "Die letzten Tage der Nacht" ein packender historischer Roman gelungen, der auf wahren Ereignissen beruht.
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Luna

Roman

Author: Julie Anne Peters

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783423711791

Category:

Page: 333

View: 8150

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The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2013

Author: Sarah Janssen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1600571751

Category: Reference

Page: 1008

View: 3199

Get thousands of facts right at your fingertips with this updated resource. The World Almanac® and Book of Facts is America's top-selling reference book of all time, with more than 82 million copies sold. Published annually since 1868, this compendium of information is the authoritative source for all your entertainment, reference, and learning needs. Praised as a “treasure trove of political, economic, scientific and educational statistics and information” by The Wall Street Journal, The World Almanac® contains thousands of facts that are unavailable publicly elsewhere—in fact, it has been featured as a category on Jeopardy! and is routinely used as a go-to, all-encompassing guide for aspiring game show contestants. The 2013 edition of The World Almanac® and Book of Facts will answer all of your trivia questions—from history and sports to geography, pop culture, and much more.
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