Ants Among Elephants

An Untouchable Family and the Making of Modern India

Author: Sujatha Gidla

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374711380

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9818

A Wall Street Journal Top 10 Nonfiction Book of 2017 A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2017 A Shelf Awareness Best Book of 2017 "Ants Among Elephants is an arresting, affecting and ultimately enlightening memoir. It is quite possibly the most striking work of non-fiction set in India since Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo, and heralds the arrival of a formidable new writer." —The Economist The stunning true story of an untouchable family who become teachers, and one, a poet and revolutionary Like one in six people in India, Sujatha Gidla was born an untouchable. While most untouchables are illiterate, her family was educated by Canadian missionaries in the 1930s, making it possible for Gidla to attend elite schools and move to America at the age of twenty-six. It was only then that she saw how extraordinary—and yet how typical—her family history truly was. Her mother, Manjula, and uncles Satyam and Carey were born in the last days of British colonial rule. They grew up in a world marked by poverty and injustice, but also full of possibility. In the slums where they lived, everyone had a political side, and rallies, agitations, and arrests were commonplace. The Independence movement promised freedom. Yet for untouchables and other poor and working people, little changed. Satyam, the eldest, switched allegiance to the Communist Party. Gidla recounts his incredible transformation from student and labor organizer to famous poet and founder of a left-wing guerrilla movement. And Gidla charts her mother’s battles with caste and women’s oppression. Page by page, Gidla takes us into a complicated, close-knit family as they desperately strive for a decent life and a more just society. A moving portrait of love, hardship, and struggle, Ants Among Elephants is also that rare thing: a personal history of modern India told from the bottom up.
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Ants Among Elephants

An Untouchable Family and the Making of Modern India

Author: Sujatha Gidla

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0865478112

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 4189

"An essential contribution to contemporary Indian literature." —Publishers Weekly The stunning true story of an untouchable family who become teachers, and one, a poet and revolutionary Like one in six people in India, Sujatha Gidla was born an untouchable. While most untouchables are illiterate, her family was educated by Canadian missionaries in the 1930s, making it possible for Gidla to attend elite schools and move to America at the age of twenty-six. It was only then that she saw how extraordinary—and yet how typical—her family history truly was. Her mother, Manjula, and uncles Satyam and Carey were born in the last days of British colonial rule. They grew up in a world marked by poverty and injustice, but also full of possibility. In the slums where they lived, everyone had a political side, and rallies, agitations, and arrests were commonplace. The Independence movement promised freedom. Yet for untouchables and other poor and working people, little changed. Satyam, the eldest, switched allegiance to the Communist Party. Gidla recounts his incredible transformation from student and labor organizer to famous poet and founder of a left-wing guerrilla movement. And Gidla charts her mother’s battles with caste and women’s oppression. Page by page, Gidla takes us into a complicated, close-knit family as they desperately strive for a decent life and a more just society. A moving portrait of love, hardship, and struggle, Ants Among Elephants is also that rare thing: a personal history of modern India told from the bottom up.
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Ants among Elephants: An Untouchable Family and the Making of Modern India

Author: Sujatha Gidla

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 9352774248

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 6055

Sujatha Gidla was born an untouchable. Her family, belonging to the Mala caste, was educated in Warangal and Madras by Canadian missionaries in the 1930s, making it possible for Gidla to attend elite schools and move to America at the age of twenty-six. It was only then that she saw how extraordinary - and yet how typical - her family history truly was. Determined to uncover that history, and understand the social and political forces that made it possible, she traveled back to India to record the testimonies of her mother, her uncles, and their friends. In Ants Among Elephants, she tells their story. Gidla's mother, Manjula, and uncles Satyam and Carey were born in the last days of British rule. They grew up in a world marked by poverty and injustice, but also full of possibility. In the slums of Elwin Peta in Kakinada, where they lived, everyone had a political bent; and rallies, agitations, and arrests were commonplace. The Independence movement offered promises of freedom from foreign rule, from want, and from social oppression. Yet, for untouchables and other poor and working people, little changed. Satyam, the eldest, switched allegiance to the Communist Party. Gidla recounts his incredible transformation from student and labor organizer to famous poet and co-founder of the People's War Group, the most notorious and successful Naxalite party. Gidla also charts her mother's battles with caste and women's oppression. Page by page, she takes us into a complicated, close-knit family as they desperately strive for a decent life and a more just society. A moving portrait of love, hardship, and struggle, Ants Among Elephants is also that rare thing: a personal history of modern India told from the bottom up.
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Among the elephants

Author: Iain Douglas-Hamilton,Oria Douglas-Hamilton

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 285

View: 1321

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The Ant and the Elephant

Leadership for the Self : a Parable and 5-step Action Plan to Transform Workplace Performance

Author: Vince Poscente

Publisher: Vince Poscente - Author

ISBN: 1893430146

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 115

View: 5009

Of all the animals the elephant rescues, only the tiny ant returns the favor.
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Missionaries and Indians

Author: Wil Gesler

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 1524680311

Category: Fiction

Page: 280

View: 3605

This book is a fictionalized account of a teenage boy growing up in a community of Lutheran missionaries in India. It attempts to honestly portray his experiences there, steering a course between either eulogizing or condemning the missionary endeavour. Indian and missionary characters weather a cyclone and floods, try to make the grade as a missionary, send out mixed messages in sermons, have their ups and downs on a river trip on a houseboat, are taken to court, get caught up in a violent political protest, suffer through a little childs illness, kill a sacred monkey, become a fantasy spy, take positions on sex, hunt a tiger, and come together for a topsy-turvy retreat at the beach. The stories told in the book touch on issues of perennial interest: the collision and integration of different worlds and cultures; interpersonal relationships among and between missionaries and Indians, between children and their parents, and between servants and masters; evolution and change; inclusion versus exclusion; religious beliefs; human-environment relationships; sex education; the real and the fake; fantasy versus reality; and taking risks.
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Joothan

An Untouchable's Life

Author: Omprakash Valmiki,Arun Prabha Mukherjee

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231503372

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 1691

Omprakash Valmiki describes his life as an untouchable, or Dalit, in the newly independent India of the 1950s. "Joothan" refers to scraps of food left on a plate, destined for the garbage or animals. India's untouchables have been forced to accept and eat joothan for centuries, and the word encapsulates the pain, humiliation, and poverty of a community forced to live at the bottom of India's social pyramid. Although untouchability was abolished in 1949, Dalits continued to face discrimination, economic deprivation, violence, and ridicule. Valmiki shares his heroic struggle to survive a preordained life of perpetual physical and mental persecution and his transformation into a speaking subject under the influence of the great Dalit political leader, B. R. Ambedkar. A document of the long-silenced and long-denied sufferings of the Dalits, Joothan is a major contribution to the archives of Dalit history and a manifesto for the revolutionary transformation of society and human consciousness.
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The End of Karma: Hope and Fury Among India's Young

Author: Somini Sengupta

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393292878

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 1638

A penetrating, personal look at contemporary India—the world’s largest democracy at a moment of transition. Somini Sengupta emigrated from Calcutta to California as a young child in 1975. Returning thirty years later as the bureau chief for The New York Times, she found a vastly different country: one defined as much by aspiration and possibility—at least by the illusion of possibility—as it is by the structures of sex and caste. The End of Karma is an exploration of this new India through the lens of young people from different worlds: a woman who becomes a Maoist rebel; a brother charged for the murder of his sister, who had married the “wrong” man; a woman who opposes her family and hopes to become a police officer. Driven by aspiration—and thwarted at every step by state and society—they are making new demands on India’s democracy for equality of opportunity, dignity for girls, and civil liberties. Sengupta spotlights these stories of ordinary men and women, weaving together a groundbreaking portrait of a country in turmoil.
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India

The Most Dangerous Decades

Author: Selig S. Harrison

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400877806

Category: Political Science

Page: 364

View: 2722

Mr. Harrison warns that unless a new democratic lender arises when Nehru steps down, India will face Balkanization or authoritarian control based on army force. His disturbing book "is a study of enduring value, fully annotated and indexed and blessed by two of the finest maps in any recent work of scholarship." Originally published in 1960. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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The Doctor and the Saint

Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi

Author: Arundhati Roy

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608467988

Category: History

Page: 179

View: 5170

“Democracy hasn’t eradicated caste,” writes Arundhati Roy. “It has entrenched and modernized it.” To best understand caste today in India, Roy insists we must examine the influence of Gandhi in shaping what India ultimately became: independent of British rule, globally powerful, and marked to this day by the caste system. ““For more than half a century—throughout his adult life—[Gandhi’s] pronouncements on the inherent qualities of black Africans, untouchables and the laboring classes remained consistently insulting,”“ writes Roy. ““His refusal to allow working-class people and untouchables to create their own political organizations and elect their own representatives remained consistent too.”“ In The Doctor and the Saint, Roy reveals some uncomfortable, even controversial, truths about the political thought and career of India’s most famous, and most revered figure. At the same time, Roy makes clear that what millions of Indians need is not merely formal democracy, but liberation from the oppression, shame, and poverty imposed on them by India’s archaic caste system. Praise for Arundhati Roy ““Arundhati Roy is incandescent in her brilliance and her fearlessness.”“ —Junot Díaz ““The fierceness with which Arundhati Roy loves humanity moves my heart.”“ —Alice Walker Arundhati Roy studied architecture in New Delhi, where she now lives. She is the author of the novel The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize. The novel has been translated into forty languages worldwide. She has written several non-fiction books, including Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers and Capitalism: A Ghost Story.
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Woolly

The True Story of the Quest to Revive History's Most Iconic Extinct Creature

Author: Ben Mezrich

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501135570

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 1548

The bestselling author of The Accidental Billionaires and The 37th Parallel tells the fascinating Jurassic Park­-like story of the genetic restoration of an extinct species—the woolly mammoth. “Paced like a thriller…Woolly reanimates history and breathes new life into the narrative of nature” (NPR). With his “unparalleled” (Booklist, starred review) writing, Ben Mezrich takes us on an exhilarating and true adventure story from the icy terrain of Siberia to the cutting-edge genetic labs of Harvard University. A group of scientists work to make fantasy reality by splicing DNA from frozen woolly mammoth into the DNA of a modern elephant. Will they be able to turn the hybrid cells into a functional embryo and potentially bring the extinct creatures to our modern world? Along with this team of brilliant scientists, a millionaire plans to build the world’s first Pleistocene Park and populate a huge tract of the Siberian tundra with ancient herbivores as a hedge against an environmental ticking time bomb that is hidden deep within the permafrost. More than a story of genetics, this is a thriller illuminating the real-life race against global warming, of the incredible power of modern technology, of the brave fossil hunters who battle polar bears and extreme weather conditions, and the ethical quandary of cloning extinct animals. This “rollercoaster quest for the past and future” (Christian Science Monitor) asks us if we can right the wrongs of our ancestors who hunted the woolly mammoth to extinction and at what cost?
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Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste

Author: Diane Coffey,Dean Spears

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9352645669

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 6004

Around the world, people live longer, better lives than in centuries past, in part because of the rapid adoption of latrines and toilets that keep faecal germs away from growing children. India is an exception. Compared to the rest of the world, latrine and toilet adoption in India has been very slow and open defecation remains far too common. This is one reason why infants in India are more likely to die than in neighbouring poorer countries like Bangladesh and Nepal, and are more likely to be stunted than children in sub-Saharan Africa. Where India Goes demonstrates that open defecation in India is not the result of poverty but a direct consequence of the caste system, untouchability and ritual purity. Coffey and Spears tell an unsanitized story of an unsanitary subject, with characters spanning the worlds of rural development policy: from mothers and babies living in villages to local government implementers, senior government policymakers, and international development professionals. They write of increased funding and ever more unused latrines. This important and timely book calls again for the annihilation of caste and for a fundamental shift in policy perspectives to effect a crucial, much overdue change.
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Evening Is the Whole Day

A Novel

Author: Preeta Samarasan

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547526121

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 652

A “psychologically acute and boldly plotted” tale of a wealthy, dysfunctional family in Malaysia (Booklist, starred review). Set in Malaysia, this internationally acclaimed debut novel offers an unflinching look at relationships between parents and children, brothers and sisters, the wealthy and poor, a country and its citizens—all through the eyes of the prosperous Rajasekharan family. When Chellam, the family’s rubber-plantation-bred servant girl, is dismissed for unnamed crimes, her banishment is the latest in a series of losses that have shaken six-year-old Aasha’s life. A few weeks before, Aasha’s grandmother Paati passed away under mysterious circumstances and her older sister, Uma, departed for Columbia University—leaving Aasha to cope with her mostly absent father, bitter mother, and imperturbable older brother. Moving backward and forward in time, Evening Is the Whole Day explores the closely guarded secrets that haunt the Rajasekharans: What was Chellam’s unforgivable crime? Why was Uma so intent on leaving? What did Aasha see? And, underscoring all of these mysteries: What ultimately became of her father’s once-grand dreams for his family and his country? “A delicious first novel . . . [Samarasan’s] ambitious, spiraling plot, her richly embroidered prose, her sense of place, and her psychological acuity are stunning.” —The New York Times Book Review “A surpassingly wise and beautiful debut novel about the tragic consequences of the inability to love.” —Booklist, starred review “The language bursts with energy.” —Publishers Weekly
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Adventures in the Anthropocene

A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made

Author: Gaia Vince

Publisher: Milkweed Editions

ISBN: 157131928X

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 3443

We live in times of great change on Earth. In fact, while previous shifts from one geological epoch to another were caused by events beyond human control, the dramatic results of our emission of carbon to the atmosphere over the past century have moved many scientists to declare the dawn of a new era: the Anthropocene, or Age of Man. Watching this consensus develop from her seat as an editor at Nature, Gaia Vince couldn’t help but wonder if the greatest cause of this dramatic planetary change—humans’ singular ability to adapt and innovate—might also hold the key to our survival. And so she left her professional life in London and set out to travel the world in search of ordinary people making extraordinary changes and, in many cases, thriving. Part science journal, part travelogue, Adventures in the Anthropocene recounts Vince’s journey, and introduces an essential new perspective on the future of life on Earth.
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When the Elephants Dance

Author: Tess Uriza Holthe

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0676806732

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 1865

“Papa explains the war like this: ‘When the elephants dance, the chickens must be careful.’ The great beasts, as they circle one another, shaking the trees and trumpeting loudly, are the Amerikanos and the Japanese as they fight. And our Philippine Islands? We are the small chickens.” Once in a great while comes a storyteller who can illuminate worlds large and small, in ways both magical and true to life. When the Elephants Dance is set in the waning days of World War II, as the Japanese and the Americans engage in a fierce battle for possession of the Philippine Islands. Through the eyes of three narrators, thirteen-year-old Alejandro Karangalan, his spirited older sister Isabelle, and Domingo, a passionate guerilla commander, we see how ordinary people find hope for survival where none seems to exist. While the Karangalan family and their neighbors huddle together for survival in the cellar of a house, they tell magical stories to one another based on Filipino myth that transport the listeners from the chaos of the war around them and give them new resolve to continue fighting. Outside the safety of their refuge the war rages on—fiery bombs torch the countryside, Japanese soldiers round up and interrogate innocent people, and from the hills guerilla fighters wage a desperate campaign against the enemy. Inside the cellar, these men, women, and children put their hopes and dreams on hold as they wait out the war. This stunning debut novel celebrates with richness and depth the spirit of the Filipino people and their fascinating story and marks the introduction of an author who will join the ranks of writers such as Arundhati Roy, Manil Suri, and Amy Tan. From the Hardcover edition.
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Untouchable

An Indian Life History

Author: James M. Freeman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351797956

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 3927

Nearly 16% of India’s population – or over 100 million people – are untouchables. Most of them, despite decades of government efforts to improve their economic and social position, remain desperately poor, illiterate, subject to brutal discrimination and economic exploitation, and with no prospect for improvement of their condition. This is the autobiography, first published in 1979, of Muli, a 40-year-old untouchable of the Bauri caste, living in the Indian state of Orissa, as told to an American anthropologist. Muli is a narrator who combines rich descriptions of daily life with perceptive observations of his social surroundings. He describes with absorbing detail what it is like to be at the bottom of Indian life, and what happens when an untouchable attempts to break out of his accepted role.
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Public Institutions in India

Performance and Design

Author: Devesh Kapur,Pratap Bhanu Mehta

Publisher: OUP India

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 502

View: 7669

This volume is an analytical study of India's public institutions. It covers the Parliament, the Presidency, the Judiciary, the Comptroller and Auditor General, the Police, the Civil Service, and economic institutions like the Reserve Bank of India, the Finance Commission, the SEBI, the TRAI, and the Pay Commission.
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Gender & Caste

Author: Anupama Rao

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9788188965205

Category: Poor women

Page: 377

View: 7380

Gender & Caste brings together important texts published, for the most part, in the last decade. This collection, the first in the series, serves as a succinct account of the caste/gender discourse, noting the theoretical tendencies that frame scholarship in the area. This volume makes explicit the ways in which Dalit women's movements have contributed to unique feminist positions that are inadequately represented within mainstream Indian feminism. Brahminical patriarchy stigmatises Dalit women for their caste position; the oppression is compounded by the control of sexuality and labour power by men of their own caste. The exclusionary politics of mainstream Indian feminism has, for long, rendered this undercurrent invisible.
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To Be Cared For

The Power of Conversion and Foreignness of Belonging in an Indian Slum

Author: Nathaniel Roberts

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520288815

Category: Religion

Page: 312

View: 5776

To Be Cared For offers a unique view into the conceptual and moral world of slum-bound Dalits (“untouchables”) in the South Indian city of Chennai. Focusing on the decision by many women to embrace locally specific forms of Pentecostal Christianity, Nathaniel Roberts challenges dominant anthropological understandings of religion as a matter of culture and identity, as well as Indian nationalist narratives of Christianity as a “foreign” ideology that disrupts local communities. Far from being a divisive force, conversion integrates the slum community—Christians and Hindus alike—by addressing hidden moral fault lines that subtly pit residents against one another in a national context that renders Dalits outsiders in their own land."
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The Ant and the Elephant

Author: Bill Peet

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780395292051

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 46

View: 4177

Many creatures are helped when two animals refuse to conform to the laws of the jungle.
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