Anthropology

What Does it Mean to be Human?

Author: Robert H. Lavenda,Emily Ann Schultz

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195189766

Category: Social Science

Page: 540

View: 3231

A unique alternative to more traditional, encyclopedic introductory texts, Anthropology: What Does It Mean to Be Human? takes a question-oriented approach that illuminates major concepts for students. Structuring each chapter around an important question, the authors explore what it means to be human, incorporating answers from all four subfields of anthropology--cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology--and offering a more balanced perspective than other texts. They address central issues of the discipline, highlighting the controversies and commitments that are shaping contemporary anthropology. FEATURES: * Covers the material in fifteen concise chapters--an ideal text for a one-semester course * Addresses issues of power and inequality in the contemporary world--including racism, ethnic discrimination, nationalism, caste, and class * Incorporates cutting-edge theory and gender and feminist anthropology throughout * Takes an explicitly global approach, discussing ways in which the spread of capitalism has drastically reshaped how people everywhere live their lives * Presents new voices and alternative perspectives from nonanthropologists and indigenous peoples through "In Their Own Words" commentaries * Provides ethnographic summaries--with maps--of each society discussed at length in the text in "EthnoProfile" boxes * Integrates additional helpful pedagogical aids including key terms, a running glossary, chapter summaries, maps, and annotated suggestions for further reading * Supplemented by an Instructor's Manual and Computerized Test Bank Course Management Systems are available from your Oxford representative.
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What Does it Mean to be Human?

Author: Richard Potts,Christopher Sloan

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 1426206062

Category: Science

Page: 175

View: 4106

This generously illustrated book tells the story of the human family, showing how our species’ physical traits and behaviors evolved over millions of years as our ancestors adapted to dramatic environmental changes. In What Does It Means to Be Human? Rick Potts, director of the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program, and Chris Sloan, National Geographic’s paleoanthropolgy expert, delve into our distant past to explain when, why, and how we acquired the unique biological and cultural qualities that govern our most fundamental connections and interactions with other people and with the natural world. Drawing on the latest research, they conclude that we are the last survivors of a once-diverse family tree, and that our evolution was shaped by one of the most unstable eras in Earth’s environmental history. The book presents a wealth of attractive new material especially developed for the Hall’s displays, from life-like reconstructions of our ancestors sculpted by the acclaimed John Gurche to photographs from National Geographic and Smithsonian archives, along with informative graphics and illustrations. In coordination with the exhibit opening, the PBS program NOVA will present a related three-part television series, and the museum will launch a website expected to draw 40 million visitors.
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Anthropology

What Does It Mean to Be Human?

Author: Robert H. Lavenda,Emily A. Schultz

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190840686

Category: Social Science

Page: 600

View: 326

A unique alternative to more traditional, encyclopedic introductory texts, Anthropology: What Does It Mean to Be Human?, Fourth Edition, takes a question-oriented approach that incorporates cutting-edge theory and new ways of looking at important contemporary issues such as power, human rights, and inequality. With a total of sixteen chapters, this engaging, full-color text is an ideal one-semester overview that delves deep into anthropology without overwhelming students.
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Anthropology, What Does It Mean to Be Human?

Author: CTI Reviews

Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews

ISBN: 1619065061

Category: Education

Page: 100

View: 7939

Facts101 is your complete guide to Anthropology, What Does It Mean to Be Human?. In this book, you will learn topics such as What Can Evolutionary Theory Tell Us about Human Variation, What Can the Study of Primates Tell Us about Human Beings, What Can the Fossil Record Tell Us about Human origins, and How Do We Know about the Human Past plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
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What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee

Apes, People, and Their Genes

Author: Jonathan Marks

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520240642

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 532

Focusing on the remarkable similarity between chimp and human DNA, the author explores the role of molecular genetics, anthropology, biology, and psychology in the human-ape relationship.
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Christological Anthropology in Historical Perspective

Ancient and Contemporary Approaches to Theological Anthropology

Author: Marc Cortez

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 0310516420

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 8087

What does it mean to be “truly human?” In Christological Anthropology in Historical Perspective, Marc Cortez looks at the ways several key theologians—Gregory of Nyssa, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Karl Barth, John Zizioulas, and James Cone—have used Christology to inform their understanding of the human person. Based on this historical study, he concludes with a constructive proposal for how Christology and anthropology should work together to inform our view of what it means to be human. Many theologians begin their discussion of the human person by claiming that in some way Jesus Christ reveals what it means to be “truly human,” but this often has little impact in the material presentation of their anthropology. Although modern theologians often fail to reflect robustly on the relationship between Christology and anthropology, this was not the case throughout church history. In this book, examine seven key theologians and discover their important contributions to theological anthropology.
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How to Think Like an Anthropologist

Author: Matthew Engelke

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400889529

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4066

From an award-winning anthropologist, a lively accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to the subject What is anthropology? What can it tell us about the world? Why, in short, does it matter? For well over a century, cultural anthropologists have circled the globe, from Papua New Guinea to suburban England and from China to California, uncovering surprising facts and insights about how humans organize their lives and articulate their values. In the process, anthropology has done more than any other discipline to reveal what culture means--and why it matters. By weaving together examples and theories from around the world, Matthew Engelke provides a lively, accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to anthropology, covering a wide range of classic and contemporary approaches, subjects, and practitioners. Presenting a set of memorable cases, he encourages readers to think deeply about some of the key concepts with which anthropology tries to make sense of the world—from culture and nature to authority and blood. Along the way, he shows why anthropology matters: not only because it helps us understand other cultures and points of view but also because, in the process, it reveals something about ourselves and our own cultures, too.
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Anthropology and/as Education

Author: Tim Ingold

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351852396

Category: Social Science

Page: 94

View: 5439

There is more to education than teaching and learning, and more to anthropology than making studies of other people’s lives. Here Tim Ingold argues that both anthropology and education are ways of studying, and of leading life, with others. In this provocative book, he goes beyond an exploration of the interface between the disciplines of anthropology and education to claim their fundamental equivalence. Taking inspiration from the writings of John Dewey, Ingold presents his argument in four close-knit chapters. Education, he contends, is not the transmission of authorised knowledge from one generation to the next but a way of attending to things, opening up paths of growth and discovery. What does this mean for the ways we think about study and the school, teaching and learning, and the freedoms they exemplify? And how does it bear on the practices of participation and observation, on ways of study in the field and in the school, on art and science, research and teaching, and the university? Written in an engaging and accessible style, this book is intended as much for educationalists as for anthropologists. It will appeal to all who are seeking alternatives to mainstream agendas in social and educational policy, including educators and students in philosophy, the social sciences, educational psychology, environmentalism and arts practice.
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Que Significa Ser Global?

Author: Rana DiOrio

Publisher: Little Pickle Press

ISBN: 9780984080632

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 3263

This is an engaging children's storybook about community, traditions, values, and diversity. Published in three languages: English, French, and Spanish.
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ReSourcing Theological Anthropology

A Constructive Account of Humanity in the Light of Christ

Author: Marc Cortez

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 0310516447

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 2201

Theologians working in theological anthropology often claim that Jesus reveals what it means to be "truly human," but this often has little impact in their actual account of anthropology. ReSourcing Theological Anthropology addresses that lack by offering an account of why theological anthropology must begin with Christology. Building off his earlier study on how key theologians in church history have understood the relationship between Christology and theological anthropology, Cortez now develops a new proposal for theological anthropology and applies it to the theological situation today. ReSourcing Theological Anthropology is divided into four sections. The first section explores the relevant Christological/anthropological biblical passages and unpacks how they inform our understanding of theological anthropology. The second section discusses the theological issues raised in the course of surveying the biblical texts. The third section lays out a methodological framework for how to construct a uniquely Christological anthropology. The final section builds on the first three sections and demonstrates the significance of Christology for understanding theological anthropology by applying the methodological framework to several pressing anthropological issues: gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, and death and suffering X
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The Origin Of Humankind

Author: Richard Leakey

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786725222

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 2509

“The name Leakey is synonymous with the study of human origins,” wrote The New York Times. The renowned family of paleontologists—Louis Leakey, Mary Leakey, and their son Richard Leakey—has vastly expanded our understanding of human evolution. The Origin of Humankind is Richard Leakey’s personal view of the development of Homo Sapiens. At the heart of his new picture of evolution is the introduction of a heretical notion: once the first apes walked upright, the evolution of modern humans became possible and perhaps inevitable. From this one evolutionary step comes all the other evolutionary refinements and distinctions that set the human race apart from the apes. In fascinating sections on how and why modern humans developed a social organization, culture, and personal behavior, Leakey has much of interest to say about the development of art, language, and human consciousness.
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How Forests Think

Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human

Author: Eduardo Kohn

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520276108

Category: Science

Page: 267

View: 1467

Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human—and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador’s Upper Amazon, Eduardo Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world’s most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction–one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.
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Our Origins

Discovering Physical Anthropology, Third Edition

Author: Clark Spencer Larsen

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393921433

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 7543

The Third Edition of this best-selling text now includes an update to the evolutionary primate taxonomy and even more tools to help students grasp the major concepts in physical anthropology—including new, photorealistic art.
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Labor and Legality

An Ethnography of a Mexican Immigrant Network

Author: Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199739387

Category: Social Science

Page: 164

View: 1721

Winner of the 2011 ALLA Book Award honorable mention! Labor and Legality: An Ethnography of a Mexican Immigrant Network is an ethnography of undocumented immigrants who work as busboys at a Chicago-area restaurant. Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz introduces readers to the Lions, ten friends from Mexico committed to improving their fortunes and the lives of their families. Set in and around "Il Vino," a restaurant that could stand in for many places that employ undocumented workers, Labor and Legality reveals the faces behind the war being waged over "illegal aliens" in America. Gomberg-Muñoz focuses on how undocumented workers develop a wide range of social strategies to cultivate financial security, nurture emotional well-being, and promote their dignity and self-esteem. She also reviews the political and historical circumstances of undocumented migration, with an emphasis on post-1970 socioeconomic and political conditions in the United States and Mexico. Labor and Legality is one of several volumes in the Issues of Globalization: Case Studies in Contemporary Anthropology series, which examines the experiences of individual communities in our contemporary world. Each volume offers a brief and engaging exploration of a particular issue arising from globalization and its cultural, political, and economic effects on certain peoples or groups. Ideal for introductory anthropology courses-and as supplements for a variety of upper-level courses-these texts seamlessly combine portraits of an interconnected and globalized world with narratives that emphasize the agency of their subjects.
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My Freshman Year

What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

Author: Rebekah Nathan

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780143037477

Category: Education

Page: 186

View: 3152

Feeling out of touch with her students, an anthropology professor describes how she enrolled as a freshman student at college in order to gain new insight into modern-day undergraduate culture. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.
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At Home in the World

Author: Michael Jackson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822325383

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 7918

Something of a nomad himself, having lived in New Zealand, Sierra Leone, England, France, Australia, and the United States, Jackson is deft at capturing the ambiguities of home as a lived experience among the Warlpiri. Blending narrative ethnography, empirical research, philosophy, and poetry, he focuses on the existential meaning of being at home in the world. Here home becomes a metaphor for the intimate relationship between the part of the world a person calls "self" and the part of the world called "other." To speak of "at-homeness," Jackson suggests, implies that people everywhere try to strike a balance between closure and openness, between acting and being acted upon, between acquiescing in the given and choosing their own fate. His book is an exhilarating journey into this existential struggle, responsive at every turn to the political questions of equity and justice that such a struggle entails.
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The Human Being

A Theological Anthropology

Author: Hans Schwarz

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802870880

Category: Religion

Page: 402

View: 6405

This overview of Christian anthropology by Hans Schwarz uniquely emphasizes three things: (1) the biblical testimony, (2) the historical unfolding of Christian anthropology through the centuries, and (3) the present affirmation of Christian anthropology in view of rival options and current scientific evidence. Schwarz begins by elucidating the special place occupied by human beings in the world, then ponders the complex issue of human freedom, and concludes by investigating humanity as a community of men and women in this world and in the world beyond. While maintaining a strong biblical orientation, Schwarz draws on a wide range of resources, including philosophy and the natural sciences, in order to map out what it means to be human. Schwarz's Human Being will interest anyone who is concerned with how in the face of fascinating scientific insights we can intelligently talk today about human sinfulness, human freedom, and human beings as children of the God who created us.
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Catching Fire

How Cooking Made Us Human

Author: Richard W. Wrangham

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 184668286X

Category: Science

Page: 309

View: 2290

In this stunningly original book, Richard Wrangham argues that it was cooking that caused the extraordinary transformation of our ancestors from apelike beings to Homo erectus. At the heart of Catching Fire lies an explosive new idea: the habit of eating cooked rather than raw food permitted the digestive tract to shrink and the human brain to grow, helped structure human society, and created the male-female division of labour. As our ancestors adapted to using fire, humans emerged as "the cooking apes". Covering everything from food-labelling and overweight pets to raw-food faddists, Catching Fire offers a startlingly original argument about how we came to be the social, intelligent, and sexual species we are today. "This notion is surprising, fresh and, in the hands of Richard Wrangham, utterly persuasive ... Big, new ideas do not come along often in evolution these days, but this is one." -Matt Ridley, author of Genome
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Created in God's Image

Author: Anthony A. Hoekema

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802808509

Category: Religion

Page: 275

View: 8590

ccording to Scripture, humankind was created in the image of God. Hoekema discusses the implications of this theme, devoting several chapters to the biblical teaching on God's image, the teaching of philosophers and theologians through the ages, and his own theological analysis. Suitable for seminary-level anthropology courses, yet accessible to educated laypeople. Extensive bibliography, fully indexed.
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Anthropology

Asking Questions about Human Origins, Diversity, and Culture

Author: Robert L. Welsch,Luis A. Vivanco,Agustn Fuentes

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199947591

Category:

Page: 608

View: 2329

From the authors who wrote the highly acclaimed Cultural Anthropology: Asking Question About Humanity, this ground-breaking general anthropology text--co-written with renowned scholar Agust�n Fuentes--takes a holistic approach that emphasizes critical thinking, active learning, and applying anthropology to solve contemporary human problems. Building on the classical foundations of the discipline, Anthropology: Asking Questions about Human Origins, Diversity, and Culture shows students how anthropology is connected to such current topics as food, health and medicine, and the environment. Full of relevant examples and current topics--with a focus on contemporary problems and questions--the book demonstrates the diversity and dynamism of anthropology today.
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