Anarchism

Author: Seán Sheehan

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1861895070

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 7566

Anarchism re-emerged on the world stage at the end of 1999 on the streets of Seattle when the World Trade Organization was brought close to collapse. Anarchist groups shared pavement space with environmentalists, pacifists and a whole host of other groups. The anti-capitalism, anti-globalization movement can be seen as a post-Cold War development, rejecting the terms of the old debate – whether capitalism or Soviet-style Communism. This new oppositional voice is allied to anarchism not just because specific anarchist groups are part of the movement, sharing a common criticism of the status quo, but also in a broader sense arising from the non-hierarchical nature of the movement and its rejection of traditional party politics. Anarchism is as much an attitude as it is a set of formulated doctrines and in this book Sean Sheehan provides an engaging introduction to what anarchism means, describing its history through anecdote and dramatic events, and offering explanations of the issues behind this "movement". He avoids a narrowly political or polemical viewpoint, using examples from all over the world and images from anarchist-inspired ideas and forms. Anarchist thinking and influences emerge in many different aspects of contemporary culture and history, and the author looks at instances in areas of political thought, history of ideas, philosophy, theories of education and ecology, as well as film and literary criticism. Systems of thought such as Buddhism and Taoism, art movements such as Dada and Surrealism, literary treatments of anarchist ideas in the work of Blake, Wilde, Whitman, Kafka and Eugene O’Neill, anarchism in relation to sex and psychology in the work of Reich and Fromm, as well as aspects of Nietzsche’s philosophy as expressions of anarchist individualism – all these and other topics are also tackled. This combination of history, anecdote and cultural analysis is an informative and lively study that is guaranteed to provoke debate.
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Anarchism: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Colin Ward

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192804774

Category: Philosophy

Page: 109

View: 4393

What do anarchists want? Can anarchy ever function effectively as a political force? Is anarchism more 'organized' and 'reasonable' than is currently perceived? Colin Ward explains what anarchism means and who anarchists are in this illuminating and accessible introduction to the subject.
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Anarchism

A Beginner's Guide

Author: Ruth Kinna

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN: 1780741278

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 3431

What do anarchists stand for? In this clear and penetrating study, Ruth Kinna goes directly to the heart of this controversial ideology, explaining the influences that have shaped anarchism and the different tactics and strategies that have been used by anarchists throughout history to achieve their ends. Kinna covers themes both historical and acutely contemporary, including: Could anarchy ever really be a viable alternative to the state? Can anarchist ideals ever be consistent with the justification of violence? How has anarchism influenced the anti-globalization movement? Ruth Kinna is Lecturer in Politics at Loughborough University, UK.
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Anarchism

A Criticism and History of the Anarchist Theory

Author: Ernst Viktor Zenker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Anarchism

Page: 323

View: 1940

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Anarchism, Revolution, and Reaction

Catalan Labour and the Crisis of the Spanish State, 1898-1923

Author: Angel Smith

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845451769

Category: History

Page: 405

View: 855

The period from 1898 to 1923 was a particularly dramatic one in Spanish history; it culminated in the violent Barcelona 'labor warsâ- and was only brought to a close with the coup d'etat launched by the Barcelona Captain General, Miguel Primo de Rivera, in September 1923. In his detailed examination of the rise of the Catalan anarchist-syndicalist-led labor movement, the author blends social, cultural and political history in a novel way. He analyses the working class 'from belowâ- and the policies of the Spanish State towards labor 'from above.â- Based on an in-depth usage of primary sources, the authors provides an unrivalled account of Catalan labor and the Catalan anarchist-syndicalist movement and thus makes an important contribution to our understanding of early twentieth-century Spanish history.
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Anarchism

From Theory to Practice

Author: Daniel Guerin,Mary Klopper

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0853451753

Category: Political Science

Page: 166

View: 6708

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Anarchism II

What is Anarchism?

Author: Heinz Duthel

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742712373

Category: Fiction

Page: 801

View: 7171

Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism I What is Anarchism? Anarchism is a political theory, which is skeptical of the justification of authority and power, especially political power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing utopian communities, radical and revolutionary political agendas, and various forms of direct action. This entry primarily describes “philosophical anarchism”: it focuses on anarchism as a theoretical idea and not as a form of political activism. While philosophical anarchism describes a skeptical theory of political legitimation, anarchism is also a concept that has been employed in philosophical and literary theory to describe a sort of anti- foundationalism. Philosophical anarchism can mean either a theory of political life that is skeptical of attempts to justify state authority or a philosophical theory that is skeptical of the attempt to assert firm foundations for knowledge. Anarchism in political philosophy maintains that there is no legitimate political or governmental authority. In political philosophy anarchy is an important topic for consideration—even for those who are not anarchists—as the a-political background condition against which various forms of political organization are arrayed, compared, and justified. Anarchy is often viewed by non-anarchists as the unhappy or unstable condition in which there is no legitimate authority. Anarchism as a philosophical idea is not necessarily connected to practical activism. There are political anarchists who take action in order to destroy what they see as illegitimate states. The popular imagination often views anarchists as bomb-throwing nihilists. But philosophical anarchism is a theoretical standpoint. In order to decide who (and whether) one should act upon anarchist insight, we require a further theory of political action, obligation, and obedience grounded in further ethical reflection. Simmons explains that philosophical anarchists “do not take the illegitimacy of states to entail a strong moral imperative to oppose or eliminate states” (Simmons 2001: 104). Some anarchists remain obedient to ruling authorities; others revolt or resist in various ways. The question of action depends upon a theory of what sort of political obligation follows from our philosophical, moral, political, religious, and aesthetic commitments. Bibliography Bakunin, Mikhail, 1873 [1990], Statism and Anarchy (Gosudarstvennost’ i anarkhii?a), Marshall S. Shatz (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. –––, 1882/1908 [1910/1970], God and the State (Dieu et l’État), New York: Dover Publishing. Ben-Dor, Oren, 2000, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham’s Constitutionalism, Oxford: Hart Publishing. Bentham, Jeremy, 1843, “Anarchical Fallacies”, in The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2. Edinburgh: Tait. [Bentham 1843 available online]
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Anarchism

A Theoretical Analysis

Author: Alan Ritter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521233240

Category: Political Science

Page: 187

View: 2840

This 1980 book aims to vindicate the central argument of anarchism as presented by leading anarchists.
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New Perspectives on Anarchism

Author: Nathan J. Jun,Shane Wahl

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780739132418

Category: Political Science

Page: 505

View: 505

The study of anarchism as a philosophical, political, and social movement has burgeoned both in the academy and in the global activist community in recent years. Taking advantage of this boom in anarchist scholarship, Nathan J. Jun and Shane Wahl have compiled twenty-six cutting-edge essays on this timely topic in New Perspectives on Anarchism. This collection of essays is unique in its global and multi-cultural scope, as its contributors hail from across the globe. The scholars and activists featured in New Perspectives on Anarchism view anarchism from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including philosophy, political science, religion, sociology, and ecology. Together, they attest to the vibrancy, intrepidity, and diversity of contemporary anarchist studies both within and without the academy. New Perspectives on Anarchism's broad approach to anarchism will make it appealing to scholars and political activists from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.
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Anarchism & The Mexican Working Class, 1860-1931

Author: John M. Hart

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292704003

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 8521

The anarchist movement had a crucial impact upon the Mexican working class between 1860 and 1931. John M. Hart destroys some old myths and brings new information to light as he explores anarchism's effect on the development of the Mexican urban working-class and agrarian movements. Hart shows how the ideas of European anarchist thinkers took root in Mexico, how they influenced revolutionary tendencies there, and why anarchism was ultimately unsuccessful in producing real social change in Mexico. He explains the role of the working classes during the Mexican Revolution, the conflict between urban revolutionary groups and peasants, and the ensuing confrontation between the new revolutionary elite and the urban working class. The anarchist tradition traced in this study is extremely complex. It involves various social classes, including intellectuals, artisans, and ordinary workers; changing social conditions; and political and revolutionary events which reshaped ideologies. During the nineteenth century the anarchists could be distinguished from their various working- class socialist and trade unionist counterparts by their singular opposition to government. In the twentieth century the lines became even clearer because of hardening anarchosyndicalist, anarchistcommunist, trade unionist, and Marxist doctrines. In charting the rise and fall of anarchism, Hart gives full credit to the roles of other forms of socialism and Marxism in Mexican working-class history. Mexican anarchists whose contributions are examined here include nineteenth-century leaders Plotino Rhodakanaty, Santiago Villanueva, Francisco Zalacosta, and José María Gonzales; the twentieth-century revolutionary precursor Ricardo Flores Magón; the Casa del Obrero founders Amadeo Ferrés, Juan Francisco Moncaleano, and Rafael Quintero; and the majority of the Centro Sindicalista Ubertario, leaders of the General Confederation of Workers. This work is based largely on primary sources, and the bibliography contains a definitive listing of anarchist and radical working-class newspapers for the period.
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Anarchism

Author: N.A

Publisher: Black Rose Books Ltd.

ISBN: 9781551645766

Category: Philosophy

Page: N.A

View: 2632

Volume One of Anarchism: A Documentary History of Libertarian Ideas, is a comprehensive and far ranging collection of anarchist writings from the feudal era (300) to 1939. Edited and introduced by noted anarchist scholar Robert Graham, the collection will include the definitive texts from the anarchist tradition of political thought, beginning with some of the earliest writings from China and Europe against feudal servitude and authority. The collection will then go on to document the best of the anti-authoritarian writings from the English and French Revolutions and the early development of libertarian socialist ideas, including such writers as Gerrard Winstanley, William Godwin, Charles Fourier, Max Stirner, as well as the early anarchist writings of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, Michael Bakunin, Peter Kropotkin, Errico Malatesta, Elisee Reclus, Leo Tolstoy, and Emma Goldman. This incomparable volume deals both with the positive ideas and proposals the anarchists tried to put into practice, and with the anarchist critiques of the authoritarian theories and practices confronting them during these years with their revolutionary upheavals. Robert Graham has written extensively on the history of anarchist ideas. He is the author of “The Role of Contract in Anarchist Ideology,” in the Routledge publication, For Anarchism, edited by David Goodway, and he wrote the introduction to the 1989 Pluto Press edition of Proudhon’s General Idea of the Revolution in the 19th Century, originally published in 1851. He has been doing research and writing on the historical development of anarchist ideas for over 20 years and is a well respected commentator in the field. Includes original portraits of the anarchists drawn by Maurice Spira specifically for this book Spira’s imagery is rooted to the political, his subject matter global. Works such as “Battle of Seattle,” “Gulf,” and “Refugees” are the visual equivalent of newspaper headlines.
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Anarchism

A Criticism and History of the Anarchist Theory

Author: E. V. Zenker

Publisher: The Floating Press

ISBN: 1775457176

Category: Philosophy

Page: 263

View: 809

Today, anarchism is often dismissed as a poorly-thought-out excuse for mayhem used by miscreants bent on destruction. However, in truth, the concept of anarchism has been explored -- and sometimes championed -- by many of history's most important political thinkers. This fascinating volume takes a detailed look at this often-misunderstood political philosophy.
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Anarchism

Author: A. M. Buckley

Publisher: ABDO

ISBN: 9781617147883

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 7585

Introduces anarchy, discusses the various forms of it, and examines its influence on art
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Anarchism as Political Philosophy

Author: Robert Hoffman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351531859

Category: Political Science

Page: 165

View: 9314

Reports of people rejecting political authority, assaulting it with words and often violent acts, are actions that are part of modern life. Anarchism has been considered a dead movement of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, but it assumed a renewed and substantial relevance in the late twentieth century. Robert Hoffman points out in his incisive Introduction that anarchists have always been viewed either as foolish idealists or, at the other extreme, as serious threats to justice and social tranquility. But, the editor argues, most anarchists have been ordinary people who have shared a singular passion for what they believe to be a just society.To clarify widespread misconceptions about anarchism, this volume offers a lively debate on the subject, consisting of works by both advocates of anarchism and people who take it seriously but reject it. Represented here, in the writings of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, Leo Tolstoy, George Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell, and others, are different types, styles, and periods of anarchist writing, reflecting a rich variety of thought arising from the anarchist perspective. The essays deal with many of the different strands of anarchists, including anarchist attacks on democracy, patriotism, and military conscription, and provide an outline of the movement's tumultuous history. Against these are set pieces that argue anarchism's impossibility and estimate its relevance to social change.The debate format of Anarchism introduces the reader to a fresh perspective and understanding of vital issues of political and social theory, and provokes him to examine his own thinking. Looking at both sides of the controversy, this volume discourages unquestioning or over-confident opinions. Although the anarchist credo that man can live without government is difficult or impossible for most people to accept, as long as we find it difficult to live within the framework of government control, the influence and potenti
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Anarchism

A History of Libertarian Ideas and Movements

Author: George Woodcock

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 9781551116297

Category: Political Science

Page: 434

View: 3877

"The essential introduction to the classical anarchist thinkers." - Mark Leier, Simon Fraser University
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Anarchism

A Collection of Revolutionary Writings

Author: Peter Kropotkin

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486119866

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 806

Includes "Law and Authority," arguing social control through custom and education, and "Prisons and Their Moral Influence on Prisoners," expressing the evils of the prison system, and other documents.
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ABC of Anarchism

Author: Alexander Berkman

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1447486919

Category: Political Science

Page: 108

View: 6344

Originally published in 1929, this early work by Alexander Berkman is both expensive and hard to find in its first edition. It is designed as an introduction to Communist Anarchism and outlines the main philosophical principles of the concept. This is a fascinating work and is thoroughly recommended for anyone with an interest in Russian history and political philosophy. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
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Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism I

What is Anarchism?

Author: Heinz Duthel

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742712381

Category: Philosophy

Page: 790

View: 8443

Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism I What is Anarchism? Anarchism is a political theory, which is skeptical of the justification of authority and power, especially political power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing utopian communities, radical and revolutionary political agendas, and various forms of direct action. This entry primarily describes “philosophical anarchism”: it focuses on anarchism as a theoretical idea and not as a form of political activism. While philosophical anarchism describes a skeptical theory of political legitimation, anarchism is also a concept that has been employed in philosophical and literary theory to describe a sort of anti-foundationalism. Philosophical anarchism can mean either a theory of political life that is skeptical of attempts to justify state authority or a philosophical theory that is skeptical of the attempt to assert firm foundations for knowledge. Anarchism in political philosophy maintains that there is no legitimate political or governmental authority. In political philosophy anarchy is an important topic for consideration—even for those who are not anarchists—as the a-political background condition against which various forms of political organization are arrayed, compared, and justified. Anarchy is often viewed by non-anarchists as the unhappy or unstable condition in which there is no legitimate authority. Anarchism as a philosophical idea is not necessarily connected to practical activism. There are political anarchists who take action in order to destroy what they see as illegitimate states. The popular imagination often views anarchists as bomb-throwing nihilists. But philosophical anarchism is a theoretical standpoint. In order to decide who (and whether) one should act upon anarchist insight, we require a further theory of political action, obligation, and obedience grounded in further ethical reflection. Simmons explains that philosophical anarchists “do not take the illegitimacy of states to entail a strong moral imperative to oppose or eliminate states” (Simmons 2001: 104). Some anarchists remain obedient to ruling authorities; others revolt or resist in various ways. The question of action depends upon a theory of what sort of political obligation follows from our philosophical, moral, political, religious, and aesthetic commitments. Bibliography Bakunin, Mikhail, 1873 [1990], Statism and Anarchy (Gosudarstvennost’ i anarkhii?a), Marshall S. Shatz (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. –––, 1882/1908 [1910/1970], God and the State (Dieu et l’État), New York: Dover Publishing. Ben-Dor, Oren, 2000, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham’s Constitutionalism, Oxford: Hart Publishing. Bentham, Jeremy, 1843, “Anarchical Fallacies”, in The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2. Edinburgh: Tait. [Bentham 1843 available online]
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Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism III

What is Anarchism?

Author: Heinz Duthel

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742712365

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 812

View: 8286

Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism III What is Anarchism? Anarchism is a political theory, which is skeptical of the justification of authority and power, especially political power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing utopian communities, radical and revolutionary political agendas, and various forms of direct action. This entry primarily describes “philosophical anarchism”: it focuses on anarchism as a theoretical idea and not as a form of political activism. While philosophical anarchism describes a skeptical theory of political legitimation, anarchism is also a concept that has been employed in philosophical and literary theory to describe a sort of anti- foundationalism. Philosophical anarchism can mean either a theory of political life that is skeptical of attempts to justify state authority or a philosophical theory that is skeptical of the attempt to assert firm foundations for knowledge. Anarchism in political philosophy maintains that there is no legitimate political or governmental authority. In political philosophy anarchy is an important topic for consideration—even for those who are not anarchists—as the a-political background condition against which various forms of political organization are arrayed, compared, and justified. Anarchy is often viewed by non-anarchists as the unhappy or unstable condition in which there is no legitimate authority. Anarchism as a philosophical idea is not necessarily connected to practical activism. There are political anarchists who take action in order to destroy what they see as illegitimate states. The popular imagination often views anarchists as bomb-throwing nihilists. But philosophical anarchism is a theoretical standpoint. In order to decide who (and whether) one should act upon anarchist insight, we require a further theory of political action, obligation, and obedience grounded in further ethical reflection. Simmons explains that philosophical anarchists “do not take the illegitimacy of states to entail a strong moral imperative to oppose or eliminate states” (Simmons 2001: 104). Some anarchists remain obedient to ruling authorities; others revolt or resist in various ways. The question of action depends upon a theory of what sort of political obligation follows from our philosophical, moral, political, religious, and aesthetic commitments. Bibliography Bakunin, Mikhail, 1873 [1990], Statism and Anarchy (Gosudarstvennost’ i anarkhii?a), Marshall S. Shatz (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. –––, 1882/1908 [1910/1970], God and the State (Dieu et l’État), New York: Dover Publishing. Ben-Dor, Oren, 2000, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham’s Constitutionalism, Oxford: Hart Publishing. Bentham, Jeremy, 1843, “Anarchical Fallacies”, in The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2. Edinburgh: Tait. [Bentham 1843 available online]
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Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism IV

Modern civilisation faces three potentially catastrophic crises:

Author: Heinz Duthel

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742712357

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 994

View: 3332

Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism IV What is Anarchism? Anarchism is a political theory, which is skeptical of the justification of authority and power, especially political power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing utopian communities, radical and revolutionary political agendas, and various forms of direct action. This entry primarily describes “philosophical anarchism”: it focuses on anarchism as a theoretical idea and not as a form of political activism. While philosophical anarchism describes a skeptical theory of political legitimation, anarchism is also a concept that has been employed in philosophical and literary theory to describe a sort of anti- foundationalism. Philosophical anarchism can mean either a theory of political life that is skeptical of attempts to justify state authority or a philosophical theory that is skeptical of the attempt to assert firm foundations for knowledge. Anarchism in political philosophy maintains that there is no legitimate political or governmental authority. In political philosophy anarchy is an important topic for consideration—even for those who are not anarchists—as the a-political background condition against which various forms of political organization are arrayed, compared, and justified. Anarchy is often viewed by non-anarchists as the unhappy or unstable condition in which there is no legitimate authority. Anarchism as a philosophical idea is not necessarily connected to practical activism. There are political anarchists who take action in order to destroy what they see as illegitimate states. The popular imagination often views anarchists as bomb-throwing nihilists. But philosophical anarchism is a theoretical standpoint. In order to decide who (and whether) one should act upon anarchist insight, we require a further theory of political action, obligation, and obedience grounded in further ethical reflection. Simmons explains that philosophical anarchists “do not take the illegitimacy of states to entail a strong moral imperative to oppose or eliminate states” (Simmons 2001: 104). Some anarchists remain obedient to ruling authorities; others revolt or resist in various ways. The question of action depends upon a theory of what sort of political obligation follows from our philosophical, moral, political, religious, and aesthetic commitments. Bibliography Bakunin, Mikhail, 1873 [1990], Statism and Anarchy (Gosudarstvennost’ i anarkhii?a), Marshall S. Shatz (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. –––, 1882/1908 [1910/1970], God and the State (Dieu et l’État), New York: Dover Publishing. Ben-Dor, Oren, 2000, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham’s Constitutionalism, Oxford: Hart Publishing. Bentham, Jeremy, 1843, “Anarchical Fallacies”, in The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2. Edinburgh: Tait. [Bentham 1843 available online]
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