An American Quilt: Unfolding a Story of Family and Slavery

Author: Rachel May

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 168177478X

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 2811

Following the trail left by an unfinished quilt, this illuminating saga examines slavery from the cotton fields of the South to the textile mills of New England—and the humanity behind it. When we think of slavery, most of us think of the American South. We think of back-breaking fieldwork on plantations. We don’t think of slavery in the North, nor do we think of the grueling labor of urban and domestic slaves. Rachel May’s rich new book explores the far reach of slavery, from New England to the Caribbean, the role it played in the growth of mercantile America, and the bonds between the agrarian south and the industrial north in the antebellum era—all through the discovery of a remarkable quilt. While studying objects in a textile collection, May opened a veritable treasure-trove: a carefully folded, unfinished quilt made of 1830s-era fabrics, its backing containing fragile, aged papers with the dates 1798, 1808, and 1813, the words “shuger,” “rum,” “casks,” and “West Indies,” repeated over and over, along with “friendship,” “kindness,” “government,” and “incident.” The quilt top sent her on a journey to piece together the story of Minerva, Eliza, Jane, and Juba—the enslaved women behind the quilt—and their owner, Susan Crouch. May brilliantly stitches together the often-silenced legacy of slavery by revealing the lives of these urban enslaved women and their world. Beautifully written and richly imagined, An American Quilt is a luminous historical examination and an appreciation of a craft that provides such a tactile connection to the past.
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Stitches in Time

Family and Slavery in Mercantile America

Author: Rachael May

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781681774176

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 384

View: 1189

Beginning with the surprise discovery of an unfinished quilt, this groundbreaking history examines slavery along the Atlantic seaboard, following the cotton that fueled New England's textile mills and the humanity behind it."
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How to Make an American Quilt

Author: Whitney Otto

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 0804181225

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 8399

"Remarkable...An affirmation of the strength and power of individual lives, and the way they cannot help fitting together." THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW An extraordinay and moving reading experience, HOW TO MAKE AN AMERICAN QUILT is an exploration of women of yesterday and today, who join together in a uniquely female experience. As they gather year after year, their stories, their wisdom, their lives, form the pattern from which all of us draw warmth and comfort for ourselves. A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE COMING OUT FALL 1995 -- with Maya Angelou, Winona Ryder, and Rip Torn
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Quilting with a Modern Slant

People, Patterns, and Techniques Inspiring the Modern Quilt Community

Author: Rachel May

Publisher: Storey Publishing

ISBN: 1603428941

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 224

View: 2906

Modern quilting allows artists the freedom to expand on traditions and use fabrics, patterns, colors, and stitching innovatively to create exciting fresh designs. In Quilting with a Modern Slant, Rachel May introduces you to more than 70 modern quilters who have developed their own styles, methods, and aesthetics. Their ideas, quilts, tips, tutorials, and techniques will inspire you to try something new and follow your own creativity — wherever it leads.
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Unbound

Transgender Men and the Remaking of Identity

Author: Arlene Stein

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 1524747459

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 339

View: 6529

Ben, Parker, Lucas, Nadia are four patients of Florida's Dr. Charles Garramonepreparing to receive surgery to masculinize their chests on the same day. In the following years, they, along with more than a hundred others across the country, opened up to the award-winning professor of gender and sexuality Arlene Stein about how they conceive of their identities and sexuality, how they decided to transition, how they were received by their families and communities, and the joys and challenges they continue to face after transitioning. Weaving together the history of the transgender movement and the personal journeys of these transgender individuals, Stein sheds light on how transgender men tell their stories, make sense of their lives, and build communities in the face of skepticism, confusion, ignorance, and, often, violence. Because despite any progress we've made as a culture in accepting alternative identities, Ben and the others Stein meets continue to live in a world that is dangerous to them. In this moving, raw, intimate book about the lives of transgender men, Stein reveals how transgender men as a group, largely invisible in previous decades, today exert a significant impact on business, medicine, culture, and have drastically reshaped how we as a nation conceive of gender, sex, and identity. In so doing, Stein has also created an essential resource on female to male transitioning- for parents, educators, friends, and those who question their identities and seek further information.
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Malindy's Freedom

The Story of a Slave Family

Author: Mildred Johnson,Theresa Delsoin,Stuart Symington (Jr.),Anne W. Symington

Publisher: Missouri History Museum

ISBN: 1883982537

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 215

View: 5432

Malindy, born a free Cherokee Indian, was unlawfully enslaved as a child by a Franklin County, Missouri, farmer. Married to a freedman, Malindy gave birth to five children in slavery - creating a family she would fight her whole life to keep together. As a testament to her iron will, Malindy's great-granddaughters Mildred Johnson and Theresa Delsoin have lived to share the story passed on through their family for generations - a story of courage, conviction, and love. In Malindy's Freedom, Johnson and Delsoin construct a narrative that realistically re-creates Malindy's world - the individuals she encountered, the crucibles she faced, the battles she won. The authors relied principally on census records, along with other primary and secondary sources, to back up the oral histories passed on from their grandmother about the "peculiar institution" of slavery. As a slave narrative, Malindy's story is unique because it makes clear that the African American experience derives from Native American and European, as well as African, roots. The beauty of Malindy's Freedom is the authors' appreciation of their ancestors as human beings, who did the best they could for their families under inhuman conditions.
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Stitched from the Soul

Slave Quilts from the Antebellum South

Author: Gladys-Marie Fry

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780807849958

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 102

View: 1280

This richly illustrated book offers a glimpse into the lives and creativity of African American quilters during the era of slavery. Originally published in 1989, Stitched from the Soul was the first book to examine the history of quilting in the enslaved community and to place slave-made quilts into historical and cultural context. It remains a beautiful and moving tribute to an African American tradition. Undertaking a national search to locate slave-crafted textiles, Gladys-Marie Fry uncovered a treasure trove of pieces. The 123 color and black and white photographs featured here highlight many of the finest and most interesting examples of the quilts, woven coverlets, counterpanes, rag rugs, and crocheted artifacts attributed to slave women and men. In a new preface, Fry reflects on the inspiration behind her original research--the desire to learn more about her enslaved great-great-grandmother, a skilled seamstress--and on the deep and often emotional chords the book has struck among readers bonded by an interest in African American artistry.
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Southern Quilts

Celebrating Traditions, History, and Designs

Author: Mary W. Kerr

Publisher: Schiffer Publishing

ISBN: 9780764355028

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 144

View: 4841

In more than 270 color images, hundreds of quilts, juxtaposed for the first time, celebrate and explore the South's rich quilting history. Quilt expert Mary W. Kerr joins 13 other textile historians to show why Southern quilts have a distinctiveness setting them apart, including factors like their patterns, use of tiny pieces, and specific color choices. Learn how the South's quilting traditions developed among all socioeconomic levels, and in communities such as African American, Scots Irish, and German. The use of cotton, the prominence of making-do aesthetics, and other characteristics are discussed, with in-depth looks at topics like feed sack use and tri-color quilts. Explore the classic patterns of Crown of Thorns, Whigs' Defeat, and Double Wedding Ring. Enjoy regional treasures like Texas Rattlesnake, the Shenandoah Valley Farmers Fancy, and many more. This compilation includes quilts from every Deep South state, offering commentary, examples, and insights.
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Comparing Notes: How We Make Sense of Music

Author: Adam Ockelford

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681778106

Category: Music

Page: 332

View: 8637

How does music work? Indeed, what is (or isn’t) music? We are all instinctively musical, but why? Adam Ockelford has the answers. A tap of the foot, a rush of emotion, the urge to hum a tune; without instruction or training we all respond intuitively to music. Comparing Notes explores what music is, why all of us are musical, and how abstract patterns of sound that might not appear to mean anything can, in fact, be so meaningful. Taking the reader on a clear and compelling tour of major twentieth century musical theories, Professor Adam Ockelford arrives at his own important psychologically grounded theory of how music works. From pitch and rhythm to dynamics and timbre, he shows how all the elements of music cohere through the principle of imitation to create an abstract narrative in sound that we instinctively grasp, whether listening to Bach or the Beatles. Authoritative, engaging, and full of wonderful examples from across the musical spectrum, Comparing Notes is essential reading for anyone who’s ever loved a song, sonata, or symphony, and wondered why.
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Abandoned Tracks

The Underground Railroad in Washington County, Pennsylvania

Author: W. Thomas Mainwaring

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 0268103607

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 1888

In Abandoned Tracks, W. Thomas Mainwaring bridges the gap between scholarly and popular perceptions of the Underground Railroad. Historians have long recognized that many aspects of the Underground Railroad have been mythologized by emotion, memory, time, and wishful thinking. Mainwaring’s book is a rich, in-depth attempt to separate fact from fiction in one local area, while also contributing to a scholarly discussion of the Underground Railroad by placing Washington County, Pennsylvania, in the national context. Just as the North was not consistent in its perspective on the Civil War and the slavery issue, the Underground Railroad had distinct regional variations. Washington County had a well-organized abolition movement, even though its members helped a comparatively small number of fugitive slaves escape, largely because of the small nearby slave population in what was then western Virginia. Its origins as a slave county make it an interesting case study of the transition from slavery to freedom and of the origins of black and white abolitionism. Abandoned Tracks lends much to the ongoing scholarly debate about the extent, scope, and nature of the Underground Railroad. This book is written both for scholars of abolitionism and the Underground Railroad and for an audience interested in local history.
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Hidden in Plain View

A Secret Story of Quilts and the Underground Railroad

Author: Jacqueline L. Tobin,Jacqueline Tobin,Raymond G. Dobard

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0385497679

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 445

Reveals the secret codes woven by African American slaves into quilts providing directions to those traveling north on the Underground Railroad.
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The Warmth of Other Suns

The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Author: Isabel Wilkerson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679763880

Category: Social Science

Page: 622

View: 9742

Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.
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Mary Schafer and Her Quilts

Author: Gwen Marston,Joe Cunningham

Publisher: Michigan State University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 80

View: 8910

Mary Schafer and Her Quilts provides an account of the quiltmaking history of nationally-recognized quilter, quilt educator, and pioneering quilt historian, Mary Schafer. Her quilts reflect a passion for historical accuracy, creative adaptations of traditional designs, and skilled quilt construction.
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Chocolate City

A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation's Capital

Author: Chris Myers Asch,George Derek Musgrove

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469635879

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 8394

Monumental in scope and vividly detailed, Chocolate City tells the tumultuous, four-century story of race and democracy in our nation's capital. Emblematic of the ongoing tensions between America's expansive democratic promises and its enduring racial realities, Washington often has served as a national battleground for contentious issues, including slavery, segregation, civil rights, the drug war, and gentrification. But D.C. is more than just a seat of government, and authors Chris Myers Asch and George Derek Musgrove also highlight the city's rich history of local activism as Washingtonians of all races have struggled to make their voices heard in an undemocratic city where residents lack full political rights. Tracing D.C.'s massive transformations--from a sparsely inhabited plantation society into a diverse metropolis, from a center of the slave trade to the nation's first black-majority city, from "Chocolate City" to "Latte City--Asch and Musgrove offer an engaging narrative peppered with unforgettable characters, a history of deep racial division but also one of hope, resilience, and interracial cooperation.
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Sandals in the Snow

A True Story of One African Family's Journey to Achieving the American Dream

Author: Dr Rose Ihedigbo Ceid Ceis,Rose Ihedigbo

Publisher: Tate Publishing

ISBN: 1625108257

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 260

View: 3237

Rose and three young children walked onto American soil wearing Sandals in the Snow, an abrupt transition from Nigeria to New York. This fascinating memoir recounts the amazing journey of an African family searching for the American dream. Rose Ihedigbo draws readers into the account beginning in two small villages in Nigeria, through snowstorms, and into life in New York and Massachusetts. This engaging story sweeps the readers in, allowing them to live vicariously through the experiences. Sandals in the Snow integrates the author's native language, Igbo, with English and utilizes African phrases and simple translations. Rose poetically describes her story and the faithfulness of God that was impressed on her through every experience. Discover hope for your own struggle in this dramatic testimony to what can be achieved through commitment, faith, and education. This memoir provides readers an understanding of religion in African villages and a personal account of the Biafra War. You will be encouraged at this portrait of human resilience and triumph over adversities.
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A Hole in the Wind: A Climate Scientist's Bicycle Journey Across the United States

Author: David Goodrich

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681774852

Category: Nature

Page: 304

View: 8238

An epic bicycle journey across the American hinterland that explores the challenges of climate change alongside a diverse array of American voices. After a distinguished career in climate science as the Director of the UN Global Climate Observing System in Geneva, David Goodrich returned home to the United States to find a nation and a people in denial. Concerned that the American people are willfully deluded by the misinformation about climate that dominates media and politics, David thought a little straight talk could set things right. As they say in Animal House, he decided that "this calls for a stupid and futile gesture on someone's part, and I'm just the guy to do it." Starting on the beach in Delaware, David rode his bike 4,200 miles to Oregon, talking with the people he met on the ultimate road trip. Along the way he learned a great deal about why climate is a complicated issue for many Americans and even more about the country we all share. Climate change is the central environmental issue of our time. But A Hole in the Wind is also about the people Dave met and the experiences he had along the way, like the toddler's beauty pageant in Delaware, the tornado in Missouri, rust-belt towns and their relationship with fracking, and the mined-out uranium ghost town in Wyoming. As he rides, David will discuss the climate with audiences varying from laboratories to diners to elementary schools. Beautifully simple, direct, and honest, A Hole in the Wind is a fresh, refreshing ride through a difficult and controversial topic, and a rich read that makes you glad to be alive.
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Lion Cross Point

Author: Masatsugu Ono

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781931883702

Category: FICTION

Page: 128

View: 6728

Originally published as: Shishiwataribana, 2013.
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A Perfectly Good Man

A Novel

Author: Patrick Gale

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1504036522

Category: Fiction

Page: 406

View: 1220

The bestselling British novel about love, marriage, family, secrets, and how the power of faith can transform lives even in the midst of inconsolable loss After being paralyzed in a rugby accident, twenty-year-old, wheelchair-bound Lenny Barnes feels he has nothing left to live for and is putting his affairs in order before committing suicide. As lively Mazey Day celebrations take place in the Cornish town of Penzance, Lenny summons a parish priest to his home. Father Barnaby Johnson is shocked to discover that he has been called in not to comfort but to deliver last rites. Lenny’s death will reverberate not only in Barnaby’s life but in the lives of his family and those around them, from Barnaby’s wife, Dorothy, to Modest Carlsson, a parishioner and former teacher whose affair with an underage student cost him his job, his marriage, and, quite possibly, his soul. Narrated in a nonlinear style from the characters’ shifting perspectives and ages, this spellbinding, exquisitely crafted novel exposes the fault lines in relationships as it limns the consequences of our actions. The novel that author Patrick Gale describes as “an echo chamber” to his international bestseller Notes from an Exhibition, A Perfectly Good Man reveals another family in crisis and asks what it truly means to be good. This Richard & Judy Book Club pick is a story of warmth, wisdom, and compassion on crises of faith, the power of prayer, morality, and what it means to be a parent.
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Some Sing, Some Cry

A Novel

Author: Ntozake Shange,Ifa Bayeza

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781429959353

Category: Fiction

Page: 576

View: 7567

Groundbreaking and heartbreaking, this triumphant novel by two of America's most acclaimed storytellers follows a family of women from enslavement to the dawn of the twenty-first century. From Reconstruction to both world wars, from the Harlem Renaissance to Vietnam, from spirituals and arias to torch songs and the blues, Some Sing, Some Cry brings to life the monumental story of one American family's journey from slavery into freedom, from country into city, from the past to the future, bright and blazing ahead. Real-life sisters, Ntozake Shange, award-winning author of for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf and Ifa Bayeza, award-winning playwright of The Ballad of Emmett Till, achieve nothing less than a modern classic in this story of seven generations of women, and the men and music in their lives. Opening dramatically at a sprawling plantation just off the South Carolina coast, recently emancipated slave Bette Mayfield quickly says her goodbyes before fleeing for Charleston with her granddaughter, Eudora, in tow. She and Eudora carve out lives for themselves in the bustling port city as seamstress and fortune-teller. Eudora marries, the Mayfield lines grows and becomes an incredibly strong, musically gifted family, a family that is led, protected, and inspired by its women. Some Sing, Some Cry chronicles their astonishing passage through the watershed events of American history.
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