All The Wild That Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, and the American West

Author: David Gessner

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393246787

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 2314

An homage to the West and to two great writers who set the standard for all who celebrate and defend it. Archetypal wild man Edward Abbey and proper, dedicated Wallace Stegner left their footprints all over the western landscape. Now, award-winning nature writer David Gessner follows the ghosts of these two remarkable writer-environmentalists from Stegner's birthplace in Saskatchewan to the site of Abbey's pilgrimages to Arches National Park in Utah, braiding their stories and asking how they speak to the lives of all those who care about the West. These two great westerners had very different ideas about what it meant to love the land and try to care for it, and they did so in distinctly different styles. Boozy, lustful, and irascible, Abbey was best known as the author of the novel The Monkey Wrench Gang (and also of the classic nature memoir Desert Solitaire), famous for spawning the idea of guerrilla actions—known to admirers as "monkeywrenching" and to law enforcement as domestic terrorism—to disrupt commercial exploitation of western lands. By contrast, Stegner, a buttoned-down, disciplined, faithful family man and devoted professor of creative writing, dedicated himself to working through the system to protect western sites such as Dinosaur National Monument in Colorado. In a region beset by droughts and fires, by fracking and drilling, and by an ever-growing population that seems to be in the process of loving the West to death, Gessner asks: how might these two farseeing environmental thinkers have responded to the crisis? Gessner takes us on an inspiring, entertaining journey as he renews his own commitment to cultivating a meaningful relationship with the wild, confronting American overconsumption, and fighting environmental injustice—all while reawakening the thrill of the words of his two great heroes.
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All the Wild That Remains

Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, and the American West

Author: David Gessner

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN: 9780393352375

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 4978

An homage to the West and to two great writers who set the standard for all who celebrate and defend it.
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All the Wild that Remains

Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, and the American West

Author: David Gessner

Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated

ISBN: 9780393089998

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 354

View: 549

An award-winning nature writer follows in the footsteps of two American writers who personified the Wild West, visiting their birthplaces and the sites they wrote about and discusses the future of the region, now plagued by droughts, fires, fracking and drilling.
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Wallace Stegner and the American West

Author: Philip L. Fradkin

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520259577

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 369

View: 6244

"Respectful of his subject but never worshipful, Fradkin has given us our first full critical portrait of the man and his protean career.."--Hampton Sides, author of Blood and Thunder: An Epic of the American West
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Marking the Sparrow's Fall

The Making of the American West

Author: Wallace Stegner,Page Stegner

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780805062960

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 359

View: 9614

Winner of three O. Henry Awards, the Commonwealth Gold Medal, the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Kirsch Award for Lifetime Literary Achievement, Wallace Stegner was a literary giant. In Marking the Sparrow's Fall, the first collection of Stegner's work published since his death, Stegner's son Page has collected, annotated, and edited fifteen essays that have never before been published in any edition, as well as a little-known novella and several of Stegner's best-known essays on the American West. Seventy-five percent of the contents of this body of work is published here for the first time.
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Beyond the Hundredth Meridian

John Wesley Powell and the Second Opening of the West

Author: Wallace Stegner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101075852

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 4535

From the “dean of Western writers” (The New York Times) and the Pulitzer Prize winning–author of Angle of Repose and Crossing to Safety, a fascinating look at the old American West and the man who prophetically warned against the dangers of settling it In Beyond the Hundredth Meridian, Wallace Stegner recounts the sucesses and frustrations of John Wesley Powell, the distinguished ethnologist and geologist who explored the Colorado River, the Grand Canyon, and the homeland of Indian tribes of the American Southwest. A prophet without honor who had a profound understanding of the American West, Powell warned long ago of the dangers economic exploitation would pose to the West and spent a good deal of his life overcoming Washington politics in getting his message across. Only now, we may recognize just how accurate a prophet he was.
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My Green Manifesto

Down the Charles River in Pursuit of a New Environmentalism

Author: David Gessner

Publisher: Milkweed Editions

ISBN: 1571318364

Category: Nature

Page: 224

View: 3382

Inspired by a rough-and-tumble journey across country and down river, David Gessner makes the case for a new environmentalism. In a frank, funny, and incisive call to arms that spans from the Cape Wind Project to the Monkey Wrench Gang, he considers why we do or do not fight to protect and restore wilderness, and reminds us why it’s time to join the fray. Though environmental awareness is on the rise, our march toward ecological collapse continues. What was once a movement based primarily on land preservation, endangered species, and policy reform is now a fractured mess of back-to-the-landers, capitalist “green lifestyle” vendors, technology worshipers, and countless special interest groups. Known as an environmental advocate “reminiscent of Edward Abbey” (Library Journal), Gessner rebels against this fragmented environmentalism and holier-than-thou posturing. He also suggests that global problems, though real, are disempowering. While introducing us to lovable, stubborn Dan Driscoll, “a regular guy fighting a local fight for a limited wilderness,” he argues instead for a movement focused on local issues and grounded in a more basic, more holistic—and ultimately more effective—defense of home.
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The Monkey Wrench Gang

Author: Edward Abbey,R. Crumb

Publisher: Dream Garden Press

ISBN: 9780942688184

Category: Fiction

Page: 356

View: 6579

Ex-Green Beret George Hayduke returns from war to find his beloved southwestern desert threatened by industrial development. Joining with Bronx exile and feminist saboteur Bonnie Abzug, wilderness guide and outcast Mormon Seldom Seen Smith, and libertarian billboard torcher Doc Sarvis, M.D., Hayduke is ready to fight the power. They (the Monkey Wrench Gang) take on the strip miners, clear-cutters, and the highway, dam, and bridge builders who are threatening the natural habitat in this is a comedic novel of destructive mayhem and outrageous civil disobedience.
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The Sound of Mountain Water

The Changing American West

Author: Wallace Stegner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0525435433

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 7158

A book of timeless importance about the American West and a modern classic by National Book Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning Wallace Stegner. The essays, memoirs, letters, and speeches collected in The Sound of Mountain Water encompass memoir, nature conservation, history, geography, and literature. Compositions delve into the post-World War II boom that brought the Rocky Mountain West--from Montana and Idaho to Utah and Nevada--into the modern age. Other works feature eloquent sketches of the West's history and environment, directing our imagination to the sublime beauty of such places as Robbers Roost and Glen Canyon. A final section examines the state of Western literature, of the mythical past and the diminished present, and analyzesd the difficulties facing any contemporary Western writer. Written over a period of twenty-five years, a time in which the West witnessed rapid changes to its cultural and natural heritage, and by a writer and thinker who will always hold a unique position in modern American letters, The Sound of Mountain Water is a hymn to the Western landscape, an affirmation of the hope emobided therein, and a careful and rich investigation of the West's complex legacy.
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American Places

Author: Wallace Earle Stegner,Page Stegner

Publisher: Penguin Classics

ISBN: 9780143039747

Category: Travel

Page: 252

View: 3288

Explores the American landscape in a work that depicts all aspects of American life, from the Rocky Mountains to the state of Maine.
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Gloryland

A Novel

Author: Shelton Johnson

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN: 1578051819

Category: Fiction

Page: 289

View: 1185

Born on Emancipation Day, 1863, to a sharecropping family of black and Indian blood, Elijah Yancy never lived as a slave — but his self-image as a free person is at war with his surroundings: Spartanburg, South Carolina, in the Reconstructed South. Exiled for his own survival as a teenager, Elijah walks west to the Nebraska plains — and, like other rootless young African-American men of that era, joins up with the U.S. cavalry. The trajectory of Elijahs army career parallels the nations imperial adventures in the late 19th century: subduing Native Americans in the West, quelling rebellion in the Philippines. Haunted by the terrors endured by black Americans and by his part in persecuting other people of color, Elijah is sustained only by visions, memories, prayers, and his questing spirit — which ultimately finds a home when his troop is posted to the newly created Yosemite National Park in 1903. Here, living with little beyond mountain light, running water, campfires, and stars, he becomes a man who owns himself completely, while knowing hes left pieces of himself scattered along his lifes path like pebbles on a creek bed.
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Finding Abbey

The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave

Author: Sean Prentiss

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826355927

Category: Nature

Page: 216

View: 4199

When the great environmental writer Edward Abbey died in 1989, four of his friends buried him secretly in a hidden desert spot that no one would ever find. The final resting place of the Thoreau of the American West remains unknown and has become part of American folklore. In this book a young writer who went looking for Abbey’s grave combines an account of his quest with a creative biography of Abbey. Sean Prentiss takes readers across the country as he gathers clues from his research, travel, and interviews with some of Abbey’s closest friends—including Jack Loeffler, Ken “Seldom Seen” Sleight, David Petersen, and Doug Peacock. Along the way, Prentiss examines his own sense of rootlessness as he attempts to unravel Abbey’s complicated legacy, raising larger questions about the meaning of place and home.
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Ultimate Glory

Frisbee, Obsession, and My Wild Youth

Author: David Gessner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 073521056X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 8130

A story of obsession, glory, and the wild early days of Ultimate Frisbee. David Gessner devoted his twenties to a cultish sport called Ultimate Frisbee. Like his teammates and rivals, he trained for countless hours, sacrificing his body and potential career for a chance at fleeting glory without fortune or fame. His only goal: to win Nationals and go down in Ultimate history as one of the greatest athletes no one has ever heard of. With humor and raw honesty, Gessner explores what it means to devote one's life to something that many consider ridiculous. Today, Ultimate is played by millions, but in the 1980s, it was an obscure sport with a (mostly) undeserved stoner reputation. Its early heroes were as scrappy as the sport they loved, driven by fierce competition, intense rivalries, epic parties, and the noble ideals of the Spirit of the Game. Ultimate Glory is a portrait of the artist as a young ruffian. Gessner shares the field and his seemingly insane obsession with a cast of closely knit, larger-than-life characters. As his sport grows up, so does he, and eventually he gives up chasing flying discs to pursue a career as a writer. But he never forgets his love for this misunderstood sport and the rare sense of purpose he attained as a member of its priesthood.
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So Quietly the Earth

Author: David Lee

Publisher: Copper Canyon Press

ISBN: 1556592043

Category: Poetry

Page: 127

View: 6307

"If we were a civilized nation, we would declare David Lee a national treasure."--Poetry East
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Sick of Nature

Author: David Gessner

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781584654643

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 234

View: 2967

Essays that trace the making of a reluctant nature writer.
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Wolf Willow

A History, a Story, and a Memory of the Last Plains Frontier

Author: Wallace Stegner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101153666

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 6676

Wallace Stegner weaves together fiction and nonfiction, history and impressions, childhood remembrance and adult reflections in this unusual portrait of his boyhood. Set in Cypress Hills in southern Saskatchewan, where Stegner's family homesteaded from 1914 to 1920, Wolf Willow brings to life both the pioneer community and the magnificent landscape that surrounds it. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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The Hour of Land

A Personal Topography of America's National Parks

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 0374712263

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 1674

America’s national parks are breathing spaces in a world in which such spaces are steadily disappearing, which is why more than 300 million people visit the parks each year. Now Terry Tempest Williams, the author of the environmental classic Refuge and the beloved memoir When Women Were Birds, returns with The Hour of Land, a literary celebration of our national parks, an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them. From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas and more, Williams creates a series of lyrical portraits that illuminate the unique grandeur of each place while delving into what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America.
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Down The River

Author: Edward Abbey

Publisher: Peter Smith Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 9780844672021

Category: Nature

Page: 242

View: 1976

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The American West as Living Space

Author: Wallace Earle Stegner

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472063758

Category: Nature

Page: 89

View: 8577

A passionate work about the fragile and arid West that Stegner loves
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Rough Beauty

Forty Seasons of Mountain Living

Author: Karen Auvinen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501152300

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 3668

10 Best Books of June—Christian Science Monitor In the bestselling tradition of Cheryl Strayed’s Wild and Helen MacDonald’s H Is for Hawk, a stunning, inspirational memoir from an award-winning poet who ventures into the wilderness to seek answers to life’s big questions and finds her way back after losing everything she thought she needed. During a difficult time, Karen Auvinen flees to a primitive cabin in the Rockies to live in solitude as a writer and to embrace all the beauty and brutality nature has to offer. When a fire incinerates every word she has ever written and all of her possessions—except for her beloved dog Elvis, her truck, and a few singed artifacts—Karen embarks on a heroic journey to reconcile her desire to be alone with her need for community. In the evocative spirit of works by Annie Dillard, Gretel Ehrlich, and Mary Oliver, Karen’s rich and compulsively readable memoir is as much an inward as it is an outward pilgrimage. Her pursuit of solace and salvation by shedding trivial ties and living in close harmony with nature, along with her account of finding community and love, is sure to resonate with all of us who long for meaning and deeper connection. Rough Beauty is a luminous, lyric exploration of and homage to her forty seasons in the mountains, embracing the unpredictability and grace of living intimately with the forces of nature while making peace with her own wildness.
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