A World Full of Emotions

Ancient Greece, 700 BC-200 AD

Author: Angelos Chaniotis,Nikolaos Kaltsas,Ioannis Mylonopoulos

Publisher: Onassis Foundation

ISBN: 9780981966656

Category: Architecture

Page: 255

View: 5200

Emotions penetrate every aspect of our lives. Interwoven with memory, attention, cognition, and decision making, they determine our interpersonal relations, our private life, the public sphere, and religious worship. Emotions had a particular significance also in ancient Greek culture, as Greek intellectuals were the first to theorize emotions in the Western world. A World of Emotions familiarizes the reader with the ubiquitous presence of emotions in Greek culture and life as well as their importance for an understanding of Greek art, literature, history, political life, society, and religion. It reveals how emotions are experienced, expressed, and aroused, how they are controlled or enslave us, how they are manipulated or evaluated. In doing so, it is hoped that this catalogue will trigger thoughts about the importance of emotions in our world, and show why the study of emotions in Classical Antiquity may help us to better understand our contemporary social and cultural environment. The catalogue A World of Emotions: Ancient Greece, 700 BC-200 AD accompanies a homonymous exhibition displaying a wide array of archeological finds from major museums and institutions in Greece, Europe, and North America. The exhibition is organized by the Onassis Foundation USA.
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From Alexander to Hadrian

Greeks in a Cosmopolitan World

Author: Angelos Chaniotis

Publisher: History of the Ancient World

ISBN: 9780674659643

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3634

The world that Alexander remade in his lifetime was transformed once again by his death in 323 BCE. Over time, trade and intellectual achievement resumed, but Cleopatra's death in 30 BCE brought this Hellenistic moment to a close--or so the story goes. Angelos Chaniotis reveals a Hellenistic world that continued to Hadrian's death in 138 CE.
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Visual Power in Ancient Greece and Rome

Between Art and Social Reality

Author: Tonio Hölscher

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520967887

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 7572

Visual culture was an essential part of ancient social, religious, and political life. Appearance and experience of beings and things was of paramount importance. In Visual Power in Ancient Greece and Rome, Tonio Hölscher explores the fundamental phenomena of Greek and Roman visual culture and their enormous impact on the ancient world, considering memory over time, personal appearance, conceptualization and representation of reality, and significant decoration as fundamental categories of art as well as of social practice. With an emphasis on public spaces such as sanctuaries, agora and forum, Hölscher investigates the ways in which these spaces were used, viewed, and experienced in religious rituals, political manifestations, and social interaction.
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Epigraphy of Art

Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings

Author: Dimitrios Yatromanolakis

Publisher: Archaeopress Archaeology

ISBN: 9781784914868

Category:

Page: 216

View: 4766

Ancient Greek vase-paintings offer broad-ranging and unprecedented early perspectives on the often intricate interplay of images and texts. By bringing together--for the first time in English-language scholarship--an international group of leading scholars in classical art and archaeology who have worked on vase-inscriptions, this book investigates epigraphic technicalities of Attic and non-Attic inscriptions on pottery as well as their broader iconographic and sociocultural significance. The ten chapters in this book propose original and expert methodological approaches to the study of vase-inscriptions and vasepaintings, while also foregrounding the outstanding but not fully examined importance of the area of vase-inscriptions for current research on ancient Greek visual representations. Epigraphy of Art: Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings constitutes a major contribution to the fields of Greek epigraphy and classical art and archaeology and will prove significant for epigraphists, archaeologists, and art-historians interested in the complexities of the interaction of art and text.
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Gods and Mortals at Mount Olympus

Ancient Finds from Dion, City of Zeus

Author: Dimitrios Pandermalis

Publisher: Onassis Foundation

ISBN: 9780990614227

Category:

Page: 160

View: 3199

Edited by Dimitrios Pandermalis Essays by Katerina Boli, Angelos Chaniotis, Fritz Graf, Maria Katsakiori, Sophia Kremydi, Richard P. Martin, Dimitrios Pandermalis, and Semeli Pingiatoglou. Located on the eastern slopes of Mount Olympus and atop the bubbling source of the ancient river Baphyras, the city of Dion and its natural environment were interpreted by the ancient Greeks as divine. Dion's proximity to the gods was reflected in the cults and daily existence of local residents but also prompted the area's critical role in establishing the identity of the royal house of Philip and Alexander the Great. With Zeus Olympus as their principal deity, generations of royalty and their followers celebrated their dedication to the god with sanctuaries, festivals, temples, statues, and public buildings, transforming the city into a central sacred site and a monumental urban center. The exhibition presents highlights of the finds of the last fifty years of archaeological excavations and is organized by the Onassis Foundation (USA) and the Dion Excavations, in collaboration with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports--Ephorate of Antiquities of Pieria.
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Women & Power

A Manifesto

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1782834532

Category: Social Science

Page: 74

View: 2585

Britain's best-known classicist Mary Beard, is also a committed and vocal feminist. With wry wit, she revisits the gender agenda and shows how history has treated powerful women. Her examples range from the classical world to the modern day, from Medusa and Athena to Theresa May and Hillary Clinton. Beard explores the cultural underpinnings of misogyny, considering the public voice of women, our cultural assumptions about women's relationship with power, and how powerful women resist being packaged into a male template. A year on since the advent of #metoo, Beard looks at how the discussions have moved on during this time, and how that intersects with issues of rape and consent, and the stories men tell themselves to support their actions. In trademark Beardian style, using examples ancient and modern, Beard argues, 'it's time for change - and now!' From the author of international bestseller SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome.
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Aphrodite's Tortoise

The Veiled Woman of Ancient Greece

Author: Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones

Publisher: Classical Pressof Wales

ISBN: 9781905125425

Category: Design

Page: 358

View: 6559

Greek women routinely wore the veil. That is the unexpected finding of this major study. The Greeks, rightly credited with the invention of civic openness, are revealed as also part of a more eastern tradition of seclusion. Llewellyn-Jones' work proceeds from literary and, notably, from iconographic evidence. In sculpture and vase painting it demonstrates the presence of the veil, often covering the head, but also more unobtrusively folded back onto the shoulders. This discreet fashion not only gave a priviledged view of the face to the ancient art consumer, but also, incidentally, allowed the veil to escape the notice of traditional modern scholarship. From Greek literary sources, the author shows that full veiling of the head and face was commonplace. He analyses the elaborate Greek vocabulary for veiling and explores what the veil meant to achieve. He shows that the veil was a conscious extension of the house and was often referred to as "tegidion", literally "a little roof". Veiling was thus an ingeneous compromise; it allowed women to circulate in public while maintaining the ideal of a house-bound existence. Alert to the different types of veil used, the author uses Greek and more modern evidence (mostly from the Arab world) to show how women could exploit and subvert the veil as a means of eloquent, sometimes emotional, communication. First published in 2003, Llewellyn-Jones' book has established itself as a central - and inspiring - text for the study of ancient women.
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Ancient Greece

Author: Thomas R. Martin

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300190638

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1589

DIVIn this compact yet comprehensive history of ancient Greece, Thomas R. Martin brings alive Greek civilization from its Stone Age roots to the fourth century B.C. Focusing on the development of the Greek city-state and the society, culture, and architecture of Athens in its Golden Age, Martin integrates political, military, social, and cultural history in a book that will appeal to students and general readers alike. Now in its second edition, this classic work now features new maps and illustrations, a new introduction, and updates throughout./divDIV /divDIV“A limpidly written, highly accessible, and comprehensive history of Greece and its civilizations from prehistory through the collapse of Alexander the Great’s empire. . . . A highly readable account of ancient Greece, particularly useful as an introductory or review text for the student or the general reader.�—Kirkus Reviews/divDIV /divDIV“A polished and informative work that will be useful for general readers and students.�—Daniel Tompkins, Temple University/divDIV/div
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Why Homer Matters

A History

Author: Adam Nicolson

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1627791809

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4389

"Adam Nicolson writes popular books as popular books used to be, a breeze rather than a scholarly sweat, but humanely erudite, elegantly written, passionately felt...and his excitement is contagious."—James Wood, The New Yorker Adam Nicolson sees the Iliad and the Odyssey as the foundation myths of Greek—and our—consciousness, collapsing the passage of 4,000 years and making the distant past of the Mediterranean world as immediate to us as the events of our own time. Why Homer Matters is a magical journey of discovery across wide stretches of the past, sewn together by the poems themselves and their metaphors of life and trouble. Homer's poems occupy, as Adam Nicolson writes "a third space" in the way we relate to the past: not as memory, which lasts no more than three generations, nor as the objective accounts of history, but as epic, invented after memory but before history, poetry which aims "to bind the wounds that time inflicts." The Homeric poems are among the oldest stories we have, drawing on deep roots in the Eurasian steppes beyond the Black Sea, but emerging at a time around 2000 B.C. when the people who would become the Greeks came south and both clashed and fused with the more sophisticated inhabitants of the Eastern Mediterranean. The poems, which ask the eternal questions about the individual and the community, honor and service, love and war, tell us how we became who we are.
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Music in Ancient Greece and Rome

Author: John G Landels

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134704860

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9644

Music in Ancient Greece and Rome provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of music from Homeric times to the Roman emperor Hadrian, presented in a concise and user-friendly way. Chapters include: * contexts in which music played a role * a detailed discussion of instruments * an analysis of scales, intervals and tuning * the principal types of rhythm used * and an exploration of Greek theories of harmony and acoustics. Music in Ancient Greece and Rome also contains numerous musical examples, with illustrations of ancient instruments and the methods of playing them.
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The Death of Carthage

Author: Robin E. Levin

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1426996071

Category: Fiction

Page: 308

View: 8757

The Death of Carthage tells the story of the Second and third Punic wars that took place between ancient Rome and Carthage in three parts. The first book, Carthage Must Be Destroyed, covering the second Punic war, is told in the first person by Lucius Tullius Varro, a young Roman of equestrian status who is recruited into the Roman cavalry at the beginning of the war in 218 BC. Lucius serves in Spain under the Consul Publius Cornelius Scipio and his brother, the Proconsul Cneius Cornelius Scipio. Captivus, the second book, is narrated by Lucius's first cousin Enneus, who is recruited to the Roman cavalry under Gaius Flaminius and taken prisoner by Hannibal's general Maharbal after the disastrous Roman defeat at Lake Trasimene in 217 BC. Enneus is transported to Greece and sold as a slave, where he is put to work as a shepherd on a large estate and establishes his life there. The third and final book, The Death of Carthage, is narrated by Enneus's son, Ectorius. As a rare bilingual, Ectorius becomes a translator and serves in the Roman army during the war and witnesses the total destruction of Carthage in the year 146 BC. This historical saga, full of minute details on day-to-day life in ancient times, depicts two great civilizations on the cusp of influencing the world for centuries to come.
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Korea's Place in the Sun: A Modern History (Updated)

Author: Bruce Cumings

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393347532

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 9291

"Passionate, cantankerous, and fascinating. Rather like Korea itself."--Nicholas D. Kristof, New York Times Book Review Korea has endured a "fractured, shattered twentieth century," and this updated edition brings Bruce Cumings's leading history of the modern era into the present. The small country, overshadowed in the imperial era, crammed against great powers during the Cold War, and divided and decimated by the Korean War, has recently seen the first real hints of reunification. But positive movements forward are tempered by frustrating steps backward. In the late 1990s South Korea survived its most severe economic crisis since the Korean War, forcing a successful restructuring of its political economy. Suffering through floods, droughts, and a famine that cost the lives of millions of people, North Korea has been labeled part of an "axis of evil" by the George W. Bush administration and has renewed its nuclear threats. On both sides Korea seems poised to continue its fractured existence on into the new century, with potential ramifications for the rest of the world.
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History of Humanity: From the third millennium to the seventh century B.C.

Author: Sigfried J. de Laet,Ahmad Hasan Dani

Publisher: UNESCO

ISBN: 9789231028113

Category: Civilization

Page: 569

View: 4092

The second volume covers the first two and a half thousand years of recorded history, from the start of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago to the beginnings of the Iron Age. Written by a team of over sixty specialists, this volume includes a comprehensive bibliography and a detailed index.
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Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062316109

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 4053

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.
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Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

Author: E.M. Berens

Publisher: Xist Publishing

ISBN: 1623959772

Category: Fiction

Page: 87

View: 3897

Read the stories of Greek and Roman myths that inspired the Percy Jackson books and other retellings of mythology In E.M. Berens collection of Greek and Roman myths, the classical stories are brought to life in detail. This Xist Classics edition has been professionally formatted for e-readers with a linked table of contents. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions. We hope you’ll share this book with your friends, neighbors and colleagues and can’t wait to hear what you have to say about it. Xist Publishing is a digital-first publisher. Xist Publishing creates books for the touchscreen generation and is dedicated to helping everyone develop a lifetime love of reading, no matter what form it takes
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The Fate of Rome

Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire

Author: Kyle Harper

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400888913

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 8573

A sweeping new history of how climate change and disease helped bring down the Roman Empire Here is the monumental retelling of one of the most consequential chapters of human history: the fall of the Roman Empire. The Fate of Rome is the first book to examine the catastrophic role that climate change and infectious diseases played in the collapse of Rome’s power—a story of nature’s triumph over human ambition. Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. He takes readers from Rome’s pinnacle in the second century, when the empire seemed an invincible superpower, to its unraveling by the seventh century, when Rome was politically fragmented and materially depleted. Harper describes how the Romans were resilient in the face of enormous environmental stress, until the besieged empire could no longer withstand the combined challenges of a “little ice age” and recurrent outbreaks of bubonic plague. A poignant reflection on humanity’s intimate relationship with the environment, The Fate of Rome provides a sweeping account of how one of history’s greatest civilizations encountered and endured, yet ultimately succumbed to the cumulative burden of nature’s violence. The example of Rome is a timely reminder that climate change and germ evolution have shaped the world we inhabit—in ways that are surprising and profound.
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Greek Lyric Poetry

A New Translation

Author: Sherod Santos

Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated

ISBN: 9780393329155

Category: Poetry

Page: 201

View: 8378

A collection of classical lyric poems is arranged into four periods including Classical, Hellenic, Roman, and Early Byzantine, in a volume that features the works of such ancient masters as Xenophanes, Callimachus, Sappho, Simonides, and Plato. Reprint.
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The Ancient World

Author: John Haywood

Publisher: Quercus Books

ISBN: 9781849164894

Category: Civilization, Ancient

Page: 224

View: 7667

The great civilizations of the distant past never cease to impress us with their spectacular achievements. Ideas, writings, and works of art speak to us across tracts of time with an amazing freshness of imagination and workmanship. This book presents a vivid, multi-faceted portrait of these achievements, set within their historical context and embracing a global coverage, which includes ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, India, China and Pre-Columbian America. The Ancient World is the most accessible guide yet produced to the spiritual, cultural, technological, and artistic innovation that was a hallmark of these complex and fascinating societies. Organized chronologically, the text places special emphasis on the evidence still remaining. Detailed coverage is given to symbols, sacred texts, religious ceremonies, gods and goddesses, visions of the cosmos, and sacred sites - from the temple of Karnak and the Valley of the Kings to the sweeping majesty of the Great Wall of China. Sample entries include: Sumer and Akkad - the first civilizations along the Indus Valley of Mesopotamia; Egypt - from the pre-dynastic 'Scorpion King' to the Old Kingdom Pyramid Age to the glories of the New Kingdom; Minoan/Mycenean civilization - the first city states; the legend of Atlantis; Roman Republic - rise of Rome; wars with Carthage; golden age of the Republic; Parthian Empire - the Hellenistic counterweight to Roman expansion in the East; Qin Dynasty - unification of China and beginning of Imperial China; Mahajanapadas - the 'Great Kingdoms' of India; Inca Empire, Machu Picchu, El Dorado.
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The Best American Short Stories 2012

Author: Tom Perrotta,Heidi Pitlor

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547242107

Category: Fiction

Page: 356

View: 8513

Presents twenty of the best works of short fiction of the past year from a variety of acclaimed sources.
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The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours

Author: Gregory Nagy

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674075429

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 750

View: 5989

The ancient Greeks’ concept of “the hero” was very different from what we understand by the term today. In 24 installments, based on the Harvard course Gregory Nagy has taught and refined since the 1970s, The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours explores civilization’s roots in Classical literature, a lineage that continues to challenge and inspire us.
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